What's Happening at Calvary

E-BLAST : Congregation Meeting on Sunday, July 19, 2015

posted Jul 13, 2015, 10:36 AM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church


There will be a meeting of the Calvary Church Congregation
immediately following service on Sunday, July 19, 2015. 
Please plan to attend. 

Friday Night Movies at Calvary -- July 31, 2015

posted Jul 13, 2015, 9:58 AM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jul 13, 2015, 9:59 AM ]

  


The next Friday Night Activity will be held on July 31st at 6:00 p.m. The movie "Black or White" will be shown, popcorn and a cold drink will be served.  The price of admission is school supplies for Halos.   Please come out for a wonderful fellowship and show your support for Halos.

 

 

HALOS… HALOS… HALOS

 

My Calvary Family, thank you for your continued support for HALOS.  It is time for our Back to School Supplies Drive.  The following items are needed; Backpacks, note books, pens, crayons, etc.  This year the activity committee is supplying the pencils, so please do not bring any pencils.   Deadline for items will be on Friday, July 31st.   Any questions regarding supplies, please feel free to give me a call at 843-884-2669

 

Thank again for your continued support.  Millie Wise.

 

Bible Study from the Episcopal Digital Network

posted Apr 13, 2015, 2:47 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jun 15, 2015, 7:41 AM ]


The Way of the Cross (Stations of the Cross)

posted Jan 27, 2015, 8:55 AM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Apr 2, 2015, 1:27 PM ]

Way of the Cross (Stations of the Cross)

A devotion to the Passion of Christ which recalls a series of events at the end of Jesus' life from his condemnation to his burial. The Way of the Cross imitates the practice of visiting the places of Jesus' Passion in the Holy Land by early Christian pilgrims. The first stations outside Palestine were built in Bologna in the fifth century. This devotion was encouraged by the Franciscans, and it became common in the fifteenth century. The number of stations for prayer and meditation in the Way of the Cross has varied, but it typically includes fourteen stations. Each station may have a cross and an artistic representation of the scene. The stations may be erected inside a church or outdoors. The BOS includes the following stations in the Way of the Cross: 1) Jesus is condemned to death; 2) Jesus takes up his cross; 3) Jesus falls the first time; 4) Jesus meets his afflicted mother; 5) the cross is laid on Simon of Cyrene; 6) a woman wipes the face of Jesus; 7) Jesus falls a second time; 8) Jesus meets the women of Jerusalem; 9) Jesus falls a third time; 10) Jesus is stripped of his garments; 11) Jesus is nailed to the cross; 12) Jesus dies on the cross; 13) the body of Jesus is placed in the arms of his mother; 14) Jesus is laid in the tomb. The BOS notes that eight of the stations are based on events that are recorded in the gospels. The remaining six (stations 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 13) are based on inferences from the gospels or pious legends. The BOS allows these six stations to be omitted from the Way of the Cross. The BOS provides opening devotions and the Lord's Prayer. There is a versicle and response, a reading, a prayer, and a collect for each of the fourteen stations. Concluding prayers before the altar follow the fourteenth station in the BOS service. The hymn Stabat Mater has been associated with the Way of the Cross. Verses of this hymn traditionally have been sung between each of the stations when the devotion is done by a congregation. The Stabat Mater appears as "At the cross her vigil keeping," Hymn 159 in The Hymnal 1982. The BOS suggests that verses of this hymn be sung as the ministers enter for the Way of the Cross and as they approach the first station. The BOS also suggests that the Trisagion be chanted as the procession goes from station to station. The Way of the Cross is a popular devotion that is often done on Fridays during Lent. However, it should not displace the Proper Liturgy for Good Friday. Some have questioned its disassociation of Jesus' death from his resurrection.

Source:  http://www.episcopalchurch.org/library/glossary/way-cross-stations-cross


Why do the Stations?

Source:  http://onlineministries.creighton.edu/CollaborativeMinistry/stations-prn.html

The most important reason for reviving the practice of making the Stations of the Cross is that it is a powerful way to contemplate, and enter into, the mystery of Jesus' gift of himself to us.  It takes the reflection on the passion out of my head, and makes it an imaginative exercise.  It involves my senses, my experience and my emotions.  To the extent I come to experience the love of Jesus for me, to that extent the gratitude I feel will be deep.  Deep gratitude leads to real generosity and a desire to love as I have been loved.  First, just a note about the history of the stations:

The History:

From the earliest of days, followers of Jesus told the story of his passion, death and resurrection.  When pilgrims came to see Jerusalem, they were anxious to see the sites where Jesus was.  These sites become important holy connections with Jesus.  Eventually, following in the footsteps of the Lord, along the way of the cross, became a part of the pilgrimage visit.  The stations, as we know them today, came about when it was no longer easy or even possible to visit the holy sites.  In the 1500's, villages all over Europe started creating "replicas" of the way of the cross, with small shrines commemorating the places along the route in Jerusalem.  Eventually, these shrines became the set of 14 stations we now know and were placed in almost every Catholic Church in the world.


How to do the Stations?

Making the stations is easy.  And, we tried to make this online experience of them an easy adaptation of what one would do, if doing them in a church before real stations.

The Context:

The first point to note is that this is prayer.  It isn't an intellectual exercise.  It is in the context of my relationship with God.  I could read through the text of each of the stations, and look at the pictures, but that wouldn't necessarily be prayer.  This is an invitation to enter into a gifted faith experience of who Jesus is for me.  It becomes prayer when I open my heart to be touched, and it leads me to express my response in prayer.

The second thing to remember is that this is an imaginative exercise.  Its purpose is not a historical examination of "what really happened" on that day in history.  It's about something far more profound.  This is an opportunity to use this long standing Christian prayer to let Jesus touch my heart deeply by showing me the depth of his love for me.  The context is the historical fact that he was made to carry the instrument of his death, from the place where he was condemned to die, to Calvary where he died, and that he was taken down and laid in a tomb.  The religious context is that today Jesus wants to use any means available to move my heart to know his love for me.  These exercises can allow me to imaginatively visualize the "meaning" of his passion and death.

The point of this exercise is to lead us to gratitude.  It will also lead us into a sense of solidarity with all our brothers and sisters.  In our busy, high tech lives we can easily get out of touch with the terrible suffering of real people in our world.  Journeying with Jesus in the Stations, allows us to imagine his entry into the experience of those who are tortured, unjustly accused or victimized, sitting on death row, carrying impossible burdens, facing terminal illnesses, or simply fatigued with life.

How to:
Just go from one station to another.  When "arriving" at a station, begin by looking carefully at the image itself.  Click on the image there to enlarge the photo.  See who is in the scene.  Look at how they are arranged and what the artist who created this image is trying to tell us about the drama there.

This online version is divided into four parts:

  • The first part is a simple description of the scene.  It helps us be conscious of what the "meaning" of this station is for us.
  • The second part is the traditional prayer at each station.  Its words become more and more meaningful as we repeat them throughout the journey.
  • The third part is the contemplation of the scene.  This is a guided reflection on the power of the scene for me, to enter it more deeply and to lead to some experience of it personally.
  • The fourth part is my response.  This is expressed in my own words.  It is the place where the sorrow and gratitude flow from my heart.
When to do them:
The beauty of the online version is that I can do the stations whenever I like.  The only guide we'd offer is to not rush through them.  Just reading through them is not making them, any more than walking around a church to look at them is making them.  It could be a wonderful prayer experience to do them as only one or two stations a day for one or two weeks.  It can also be powerful to do all 14, very prayerfully, over the course of 40 minutes to an hour, in a single evening, or to do seven one night and seven the following night.  Finally, it can be wonderful to return to the experience several weeks or months later, and discover that because of some struggle or difficulty I am experiencing, the stations become a different experience and a fresh experience of consolation.


The First Station:  Jesus is condemned to die.
Jesus stands in the most human of places.  He has already experienced profound solidarity with so many on this earth, by being beaten and tortured.  Now he is wrongfully condemned to punishment by death.  His commitment to entering our lives completely begins its final steps.  He has said "yes" to God and placed his life in God's hands.  We follow him in this final surrender, and contemplate with reverence each place along the way, as he is broken and given for us.

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

As I view the scene, I become moved by both outrage and gratitude.
I look at Jesus.  His face.  The crown of thorns.  The blood.  His clothes stuck to the wounds on his back. 
Pilate washes his hands of the whole affair.  Jesus' hands are tied behind his back.

This is for me.  That I might be free.  That I might have eternal life. 
As the journey begins I ask to be with Jesus.  To follow his journey. I express my love and thanks.



The Second Station:  Jesus Carries His Cross.
Jesus is made to carry the cross on which he will die.  It represents the weight of all our crosses.  What he must have felt as he first took it upon his shoulders!  With each step he enters more deeply into our human experience.  He walks in the path of human misery and suffering, and experiences its crushing weight.

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

I contemplate the wood of that cross.  I imagine how heavy it is.  I reflect upon all it means that Jesus is carrying it.
I look into his eyes.  It's all there.

This is for me.  So I place myself with him in this journey.  In its anguish.  In his freedom and surrender.  In the love that must fill his heart.

With sorrow and gratitude, I continue the journey.  Moved by the power of his love, I am drawn to him and express my love in the words that come to me.



The Third Station:  Jesus Falls the First Time.
The weight is unbearable.  Jesus falls under it.  How could he enter our lives completely without surrendering to the crushing weight of the life of so many on this earth!  He lays on the ground and knows the experience of weakness beneath unfair burdens.  He feels the powerlessness of wondering if he will ever be able to continue.  He is pulled up and made to continue.

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

I stare at the weakness in his eyes.  I can look at his whole body and see the exhaustion.
As I behold him there on the ground, being roughly pulled up, I know forever how profoundly he understands my fatigue and my defeats.

This is for me.  In grief and gratitude I want to let him remain there.  As I watch him stand again and gain an inner strength, I accept his love and express my thanks.



The Fourth Station:  Jesus Meets His Mother.
Jesus' path takes him to a powerful source of his strength to continue.  All his life, his mother had taught him the meaning of the words, "Behold, the handmaid of the Lord."  Now they look into each other's eyes.  How pierced-through her heart must be!  How pained he must be to see her tears!  Now, her grace-filled smile blesses his mission and stirs his heart to its depth.  Love and trust in God bind them together.

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

As I watch them in this place along the way, I contemplate the mystery of love's power to give strength.
She knows the sorrow in every mother's heart, who has lost a child to tragedy or violence.
I look at the two of them very carefully, and long for such love and such peace.

This is for me.  Such incredible freedom.  The availability of a servant.  I find the words to express what is in my heart.



The Fifth Station:  Simon Helps Jesus Carry His Cross.
Jesus even experiences our struggle to receive help.  He is made to experience the poverty of not being able to carry his burden alone.  He enters into the experience of all who must depend upon others to survive.  He is deprived of the satisfaction of carrying this burden on his own.

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

I look into his face and contemplate his struggle.  His weariness and fragility.  His impotence.
I see how he looks at Simon, with utmost humility and gratitude.

This is for me. So I feel anguish and gratitude.  I express my thanks that he can continue this journey.  That he has help.  That he knows my inability to carry my burden alone.

I say what is in my heart, with deep feeling.



The Sixth Station:  Veronica Wipes the Face of Jesus.
Jesus' journey is at times brutal.  He has entered into the terrible experiences of rejection and injustice.  He has been whipped and beaten. His face shows the signs of his solidarity with all who have ever suffered injustice and vile, abusive treatment.  He encounters a compassionate, loving disciple who wipes the vulgar spit and mocking blood from his face.  On her veil, she discovers the image of his face - his gift to her.  And, for us to contemplate forever.

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

What does the face of Jesus hold for me?  What do I see, as I look deeply into his face?
Can I try to comfort the agony and pain? Can I embrace him, with his face so covered with his passion?

The veil I behold is a true icon of his gift of himself. This is for me.  In wonder and awe, I behold his face now wiped clean, and see the depth of his suffering in solidarity with all flesh.



The Seventh Station:  Jesus Falls the Second Time.
Even with help, Jesus stumbles and falls to the ground.  In deep exhaustion he stares at the earth beneath him.  "Remember, you are dust and to dust you will return."  He has seen death before.  Now he can feel the profound weakness of disability and disease and aging itself, there on his knees, under the weight of his cross.

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

I contemplate Jesus brought very low.  As I behold him there on the ground, with all the agony taking its toll on him, I let my heart go out to him.
I store up this image in my heart, knowing that I will never feel alone in my suffering or in any diminishment, with this image of Jesus on the ground before me.

This is for me, so I express the feelings in my heart.



The Eighth Station:  Jesus Meets the Women of Jerusalem.
The women of Jerusalem, and their children, come out to comfort and thank him.  They had seen his compassion and welcomed his words of healing and freedom.  He had broken all kinds of social and religious conventions to connect with them.  Now they are here to support him.  He feels their grief.  He suffers, knowing he can't remain to help them more in this life.  He knows the mystery of facing the separation of death.

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

I look at their faces.  So full of love and gratitude, loss and fear.  I contemplate what words might have passed between them.
I remember all his tender, compassionate, merciful love for me.  I place myself with these women and children to support him.

This is for me.  So, I let this scene stir up deep gratitude.



The Ninth Station:  Jesus Falls the Third Time.
This last fall is devastating.  Jesus can barely proceed to the end.  Summoning all this remaining strength, supported by his inner trust in God, Jesus collapses under the weight of the cross.  His executioners look at him as a broken man, pathetic yet paying a price he deserves.  They help him up so he can make it up the hill of crucifixion.

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

I pause to contemplate him there on the ground. The brokeness that makes me whole.  The surrender that gives me life.
I pause to experience and receive how completely he loves me. He is indeed completely poured out for me.

As I treasure this gifted experience, I express what is in my heart.



The Tenth Station:  Jesus is Stripped.
Part of the indignity is to be crucified naked. Jesus is completely stripped of any pride  The wounds on his back are torn open again.  He experiences the ultimate vulnerability of the defenseless. No shield or security protects him.  As they stare at him, his eyes turn to heaven.

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

I pause to watch the stripping.  I contemplate all that is taken from him.  And, how he faces his death with such nakedness.
I reflect upon how much of himself he has revealed to me.  Holding nothing back. 

As I look at him in his humility, I know that this is for me, and I share my feelings of gratitude.



The Eleventh Station:  Jesus is Nailed to the Cross.
Huge nails are hammered through his hands and feet to fix him on the cross.  He is bleeding much more seriously now.  As the cross is lifted up, the weight of his life hangs on those nails.  Every time he struggles to pull himself up to breathe, his ability to cling to life slips away. 

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

I make myself watch the nails being driven through his flesh.  And I watch his face.
I contemplate the completeness of his entry into our lives.  Can there be any pain or agony he would not understand?

This is for me.  Nailed to a cross to forever proclaim liberty to captives.  What sorrow and gratitude fill my heart!



The Twelfth Station:  Jesus Dies On The Cross.
Between two criminals, a mocking title above his head, with only Mary and John and Mary Magdalene to support him, Jesus surrenders his last breath:  "Into your hands I commend my spirit." 

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

I stand there, at the foot of the cross, side by side with all of humanity, and behold our salvation.
I carefully watch and listen to all that is said.
And then, I experience the one who gives life pass from life to death, for me.  I console Mary and John and Mary.  And let them console me.

This is the hour to express the deepest feelings within me.



The Thirteenth Station:  Jesus Is Taken Down From The Cross.
What tender mourning!  Jesus' lifeless body lays in his mother's arms.  He has truly died.  A profound sacrifice, complete.

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

I behold this scene at the foot of the cross.  I contemplate touching, caressing his body.  I remember all his hands have touched, all who have been blessed by his warm embrace.
I pause to let it soak in.  He knows the mystery of death.  He has fallen into God's hands.

For me.  That I might love as I have been loved.  I pour out my heart to the God of all mercies. 




The Fourteenth Station:  Jesus Is Laid In The Tomb.
They take the body of Jesus to its resting place.  The huge stone over the tomb is the final sign of the permanence of death.  In this final act of surrender, who would have imagined this tomb would soon be empty or that Jesus would show himself alive to his disciples, or that they would recognize him in the breaking of bread?  Oh, that our hearts might burn within us, as we realize how he had to suffer and die so as to enter into his glory, for us.

We adore you, O Christ, and we bless you.
Because by your holy cross you have redeemed the world.

I pause to contemplate this act of closure on his life.  In solidarity with all humanity, his body is taken to its grave. 

I stand for a moment outside this tomb.  This final journey of his life has shown me the meaning of his gift of himself for me.  This tomb represents every tomb I stand before with fear, in defeat, struggling to believe it could ever be empty.

In the fullness of faith in the Risen One, given by his own Holy Spirit, I express my gratitude for this way of the cross.  I ask Jesus, whose hands, feet and side still bear the signs of this journey, to grant me the graces I need to take up my cross to be a servant of his own mission.



Note
Modern liturgists have emphasized that devotion to the Passion is incomplete without reference to the Resurrection and have thus fostered the addition of a "fifteenth station," the Resurrection of Jesus.

The Fifteenth Station:  The Resurrection

J
esus, your friends were devastated in their loss. Their darkness couldn't have been any deeper. As we find ourselves in Winter, it can seem like life has given out on us. Yet we know that it is impossible to snuff out the life God has given. Even when all seems lost, your Resurrection gives us new hope!
As a child, sometimes I feel sad. I can think of those who have died and how much I miss them. I can worry about many things.
As an adult, I can despair when I think of family members and friends who have died. I can forget that you died and rose again in order to save them and prepare a place for them.
Help me remember that, through Baptism, I have become a child of God. I am united with Christ, with those who live around me, and with those who have died as well. Jesus suffered all the difficulties I must face, so I know you understand my challenges and walk with me as I face them. I know I must face certain difficulties. Even though I don't like them, help me feel your presence with me.


LET US PRAY
God, you so loved the world that you gave your only son, who died and rose for all of us. Help me be thankful for the eternal life promised me. Help me approach you often for the forgiveness I need, the forgiveness Jesus won for me through his passion, death and resurrection. Help me use the gifts of the Holy Spirit to face all the challenges that confront me. I know that sin, suffering and death have been overcome by the resurrection of your son. Help me share in the joy of all who have been redeemed, that I may be renewed, made more perfect, and cry out with joy with all your people


Source:  Pictures are from http://ourladyswarriors.org/prayer/stations.htm

Charleston Area Justice Ministry (CAJM)

posted Dec 13, 2012, 2:23 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church


CHARLESTON AREA JUSTICE MINISTRY (CAJM)

The Charleston Area Justice Ministry (CAJM) is organized to do powerful justice in Charleston, Dorchester, and Berkeley Counties of South Carolina.  Clergy and laity from the Charleston area formed CAJM.  It is currently composed 22 congregations from the following faith communities: African Methodist Episcopal (AME), Baptist, Congregational, Episcopalian, Greek Orthodox, Lutheran, Orthodox Union of Judaism, Presbyterian, Roman Catholic, Union of Reform Judaism, Unitarian, and United Methodist.  

Calvary Episcopal Church’s Mrs. Jennie L. Cooper and Mrs. Elaine Gambrell are two leaders in CAJM.  They are called Justice Ministry “Team Members” and they have organized about 20 people to serve as Justice Ministry “Network Members,” including: Mr. George I. Bush, Jr., Mrs. Arenilla Bush, Mrs. Wilhelmina A. Frasier, Mrs. Andrea J. Magwood, Mrs. Andrea Robinson-Lawrence, Mrs. Veronica C. Sheppard, and Ms. Jewell Dingle.

A CAJM Research Meeting Kick-off was held at New Tabernacle Fourth Baptist Church earlier this month.   The purpose of Research Meetings is to build relationships with community leaders (locally, statewide, and nationwide) who have been involved in justice issues of interest to CAJM.  CAJM Research Committees will work to: (a) understand the relationships between these leaders and the issues and (b) obtain information about how they are helping to resolve—or have resolved—these issues in their communities.  The two Justice Issues that CAJM will research in 2013 are: (1) Education and (2) Crime/Violence. 

The CAJM Education Research Committee consists of 70 people and the CAJM Crime/Violence Research Committee consists of 50 people.  They will conduct research meetings on a regular basis to develop a solid understanding of these two issues and identify winnable solutions to these issues based on the “Issue Criteria” which stipulate that the issue: (1) is Popular, (2) is Unifying (not divisive to CAJM), (3) involves Local decision-makers, (4) is Winnable (because our power as a community is significant to the decision-maker), and (5) is Controversial (it was highlighted during CAJM House Meetings and approved at a CAJM Community Problems Assembly).

Please respond favorably when Calvary’s Justice Ministry Team Members and Network Members invite you to attend several important, upcoming meetings in 2013, including: (1) Team Assembly on March 18th, (2) Rally on April 8th, (3) Nehemiah Action Assembly on April 29th, and (4) Celebration on June 10th.



Deacon Ed Dyckman, Chair, Department of Social Ministries, Diocese of South Carolina




 

Coming Street / St. Philip / Line Street Two-Way Plan ...

posted May 22, 2012, 9:11 AM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated May 22, 2012, 11:48 AM ]

COMING ST. PHILIP LINE ST. TWO-WAY PLAN:  

The plan and study is online. The City Dept. of Traffic and Transportation is recommending the adoption of Alternate #2 which converts Coming to two-way from Beaufain St. to Race street, the conversion of St. Philip to two-way from Beaufain to Calhoun and the conversion of Line Street to two-way for Rutledge to King.  The entire study is online at:

http://www.charleston-sc.gov/shared/docs/0/comingstreettwo-wayconversionanalysis%20final022812.pdf  

The Cannonborough/Elliottborough and the Radcliffborough Neighborhood Associations are currently supporting Alternate #2.


One80 Place (formerly Crisis Ministries) Little Red Wagon - Don't forget to bring your donation

posted Feb 24, 2012, 8:02 AM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Mar 9, 2015, 3:00 PM ]

 
-- Please keep the Little Red Wagon donations “rolling-in” each Second Sunday!  The folks at One80 Place (formerly named Crisis Ministries Homeless Shelter) on Meeting Street are delighted to receive our gifts of: deodorant, sunscreen, new shower shoes (flip flops), new men’s and women’s t-shirts, new men’s and women’s underwear, pasta, coffee, PAM cooking spray, vegetable and olive oil, breakfast cereal, #10 cans (large) of vegetables and fruit, laundry detergent, packaged socks, Dixie paper cups, new reusable water bottles, toilet paper, paper towels, and cleaning supplies.  Just a can or box per week from every Calvary family can make a great difference!  Please contact Ms. Marion Holmes, Little Red Wagon Ministry Leader, with questions at 884-0584.


The Little Red Wagon is our collection point on Sunday for food and non-perishable items for donation to Crisis Ministries homeless shelter.  Please place your items in the Little Red Wagon as you enter church each Sunday.  Ms. Marion Holmes, Little Red Wagon Ministry Leader, will ask a volunteer to roll the wagon towards the altar when the ushers bring the collection plates for blessing; and arrange a volunteer to bring the items to Crisis Ministries during the week.  Think of the Little Red Wagon when you shop.

Just a can or box of food or other supplies per week from every Calvary family can make a great difference!  If you would like to learn more about helping with this new ministry, please contact Marion at 884-0584 or holmeslongm60@gmail.com.




THERE IS ALWAYS A NEED FOR FOOD AND SUPPLIES.


Urgently needed items:
- New, white towels and washcloths
– New, white pillowcases
– New pillows
– New, white, twin-size cotton blankets

Ongoing needs:

Food:
- USDA approved bacon, sausage, ham, chicken, and ground beef
– Breakfast Items like eggs, syrup, cereal, breakfast bars, oatmeal, waffles, grits, biscuits
– Orange Juice
– Milk
– Cooking Oils – Vegetable Oil, Pam Spray, Butter
– Fruit
– Coffee

Children’s Needs:
- New single and double baby strollers
– New infant car seats
– Diapers, especially newborn, size 5 and 6, and pull-up diapers
– Shower shoes for kids (flip-flops)

Personal – all items must be new and unused:
- New, packaged undergarments for men, women and children
– Shower shoes for women (flip-flops)
– Soap
– Feminine hygiene products
– Ponchos and umbrellas
– Reading glasses and sunglasses
– Ear plugs

Linens – all items must be new:
- New, white, twin sheet sets
– New pillows
– New, white towels
– New, white, twin blankets

Other:
- Bike locks and bike lights
– Tissues
– Cold medicines


One80 Place recently completed a new homeless services center directly adjacent to our current property in Charleston.

You can now drop off donations at the Bakker Family Donation Center.
 
  Mailing Address:
  PO Box 20038
  Charleston, SC 29413
  Assistance: help@one80place.org
  Email: info@one80place.org
  Phone: (843) 723-9477
WE’RE HERE TO HELP

One-Eighty Place is located at 35 Walnut Street in Charleston. Our doors are open to those in need 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

If you need shelter, please call us at 843-737-8357. Leave a message and we will return your call. You can also email help@one80place.org.


The staff at One-Eighty Place understands the challenges, causes and obstacles homeless individuals face. Drugs and alcohol, family issues, mental health problems, PTSD, we have seen and dealt with all of it. Helping homeless citizens begin again is all that we do.

We have proven programs in place and a very good success rate for helping people turn their lives around. Our programs are tailored to each individual because we know everyone has their own set of circumstances. The option to stay with us is yours. We will not force you to stay. We are here to help those who want help.

 
CHARLESTON SHELTER

35 Walnut Street
Charleston, SC 29403

view google map


 About the Charleston Shelter:

– Men’s Shelter with 70 beds, 40 transitional housing beds for male Veterans and 10 overflow cots during extreme weather conditions

– Family Center holds 30 beds for women and families and 10 transitional housing beds for female Veterans

 
 SUMMERVILLE SHELTER

 107 Elks Lodge Lane
  Summerville, SC 29483

  view google map


 About the Summerville Shelter:

– Housing for up to 28 women and families

– Established by Dorchester Interfaith Outreach Ministries in 1989 in response to needs arising from Hurricane Hugo

– Became a program of One80 Place in 2012

Our Summerville location, formerly the Palmetto House, allows homeless women and families living in the Summerville area to remain in a familiar location. Those staying at this location have access, including transportation, to all of the available services and programs provided at our downtown location.

If you are a single female or a female with dependent children in need of temporary housing, please call our Housing Assistance Line (843) 737-8357.


OUR DOOR IS ALWAYS OPEN.

If you or someone you know is on the brink of, or currently homeless, we invite you to come see what we offer.
CONNECT WITH US


BAKKER FAMILY DONATION CENTER HOURS:
Monday – Friday 8 am – 12 pm and 1 – 5 pm

The Bakker Family Donation Center is open!
Please understand we are not equipped to accept donations outside of our donation hours. If you are unsure if we can accept your donation, please call 843-737-8387 during regular business hours.

Please note: We cannot accept clothing, toys, household items, used baby items or prepared foods from individuals.

To make a donation in Summerville, or if you have a large donation or questions about needed items, please contact our Director of Community Engagement,
Brad Cashman, at 843-737-8369 or bcashman@one80place.org.

Summerville Donation Hours:
Saturday and Sunday 8 am – 4 pm

Thank you for supporting One80 Place!



HALOS - Turning help into hope.

posted Jun 22, 2011, 2:14 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Dec 27, 2011, 7:40 PM ]

Calvary’s HALOS representative is Mrs. Mildred Wise.  She sincerely thanks parishioners and friends for their financial support when called upon and ask for your continued support.  She is still collecting monies for summer camps and you will receive more information for Back to School supplies.


HALOS is the Proud Recipient of the 2011 Erin Hardwick Award for Excellence in Nonprofit Management from the South Carolina Association of Nonprofit Organizations

Every day, children across South Carolina suffer from abuse and neglect. In 2004, 17 cases on average were confirmed each day in the state. And in Charleston County alone, more than 1,800 children have open cases of abuse or neglect with the Department of Social Services.

At HALOS (Helping And Lending Outreach Support), we provide assistance to abused and neglected children in Charleston County and to their caregivers. Through a variety of programs and initiatives, we help to improve the lives of these children.

However, HALOS is only as strong as our partners, and we need your help to succeed in our mission. With a single donation, you can change the life of a child.

HALOS works hand-in-hand with individuals, businesses, civic groups, clubs, and religious organizations in the Charleston area to help children and their caregivers. Through partnerships with generous individuals and groups, we connect interested parties with children who desperately need their help. Donors can sponsor children for summer camp, supply much-needed back-to-school items, and donate gifts to celebrate birthdays and Christmas. Donors can also provide essential household items to caregivers who need them to keep children out of foster care. And through the Kinship Care program, volunteers can donate their time and expertise to support those caregivers who provide a safety net for abused and neglected children.

Imagine the relief a little boy feels when he is able to stay with his grandparents instead of moving to a foster home. Or the joy a little girl feels after years of neglect when she goes to summer camp for the first time and has a safe place to stay during the summer.

Then imagine how you can make such a difference in the life of a child in your community.

 HALOS WISH LIST

  • New or Gently Used Twin Beds, Bunk Beds, Toddler Beds, and Cribs in good condition and assembled (we CANNOT accept cribs with drop-down sides or missing hardware)
  • Diapers (Newborn through Size 5), Pull-Ups, and Baby Wipes
  • New Car Seats
  • Living/dining room furniture
  • Dressers
  • Household products (dishware, silverware, pots/pans, cleaning supplies, towels)
  • Bedding (sheets/pillowcases, comforters, blankets, etc)
  • Gift Cards to WalMart/Target for Birthdays and holidays
  • Small items for teen gifts (jewelry, picture frames, wallets, caps, etc.)
  • Monetary donations to send children to summer camp
  • Unrestricted monetary donations

 Volunteers for Kinship Care Resource & Support Program:

  • Background-checked volunteers aged 16 and over to provide childcare at monthly support group meetings and respite events
  • Volunteer groups to prepare food for adults and children at monthly support group meetings (average of 25 adults and 45 children per meeting)

There are some items that we cannot accept at HALOS.  Please ask us where you can go to donate the following items that we do not accept here:

  • Used car seats
  • Clothing for children over 24 months of age
  • Used toys
  • Cribs that have drop-down sides


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