What's Happening at Calvary

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/first-black-episcopal-church-leader-will-continue-his-fathers-teachings/2015/10/14/bede82e2-72b2-11e5-8d93-0af317ed58c9_story.html http://www.episcopalchurchsc.org/lent-2016.html https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/episcopal-church-installs-its-first-african-american-bishop/2015/11/01/d9b7c44c-80d2-11e5-9afb-0c971f713d0c_story.htmlhttps://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/episcopal-church-installs-its-first-african-american-bishop/2015/11/01/d9b7c44c-80d2-11e5-9afb-0c971f713d0c_story.html

READINGS AND GOSPELS for Sunday, November 18, 2018

posted Dec 10, 2016, 12:55 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Nov 12, 2018, 3:55 PM ]





Twenty-Sixth Sunday after Pentecost

Occasion:  Proper 28
Sunday, November 18, 2018
Year (cycle):  B

The Collect: 

Blessed Lord, who caused all holy Scriptures to be written for our learning: Grant us so to hear them, read, mark, learn, and inwardly digest them, that we may embrace and ever hold fast the blessed hope of everlasting life, which you have given us in our Savior Jesus Christ; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Old Testament: 
1 Samuel 1:4-20 [Alternate: Daniel 12:1-3]

4On the day when Elkanah sacrificed, he would give portions to his wife Peninnah and to all her sons and daughters; 5but to Hannah he gave a double portion, because he loved her, though the Lord had closed her womb. 6Her rival used to provoke her severely, to irritate her, because the Lord had closed her womb. 7So it went on year after year; as often as she went up to the house of the Lord, she used to provoke her. Therefore Hannah wept and would not eat. 8Her husband Elkanah said to her, ‘Hannah, why do you weep? Why do you not eat? Why is your heart sad? Am I not more to you than ten sons?’

After they had eaten and drunk at Shiloh, Hannah rose and presented herself before the Lord. Now Eli the priest was sitting on the seat beside the doorpost of the temple of the Lord. 10She was deeply distressed and prayed to the Lord, and wept bitterly. 11She made this vow: ‘O Lord of hosts, if only you will look on the misery of your servant, and remember me, and not forget your servant, but will give to your servant a male child, then I will set him before you as a nazirite until the day of his death. He shall drink neither wine nor intoxicants, and no razor shall touch his head.’

12 As she continued praying before the Lord, Eli observed her mouth. 13Hannah was praying silently; only her lips moved, but her voice was not heard; therefore Eli thought she was drunk. 14So Eli said to her, ‘How long will you make a drunken spectacle of yourself? Put away your wine.’ 15But Hannah answered, ‘No, my lord, I am a woman deeply troubled; I have drunk neither wine nor strong drink, but I have been pouring out my soul before the Lord. 16Do not regard your servant as a worthless woman, for I have been speaking out of my great anxiety and vexation all this time.’ 17Then Eli answered, ‘Go in peace; the God of Israel grant the petition you have made to him.’ 18And she said, ‘Let your servant find favour in your sight.’ Then the woman went to her quarters,* ate and drank with her husband, and her countenance was sad no longer.

19 They rose early in the morning and worshipped before the Lord; then they went back to their house at Ramah. Elkanah knew his wife Hannah, and the Lord remembered her. 20In due time Hannah conceived and bore a son. She named him Samuel, for she said, ‘I have asked him of the Lord.’

Alternate: 
Daniel 12:1-3

1 ‘At that time Michael, the great prince, the protector of your people, shall arise. There shall be a time of anguish, such as has never occurred since nations first came into existence. But at that time your people shall be delivered, everyone who is found written in the book. 2Many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt. 3Those who are wise shall shine like the brightness of the sky, and those who lead many to righteousness, like the stars for ever and ever.

Psalm: 
1 Samuel 2:1-10 [Alternate: Psalm 16]

1 Hannah prayed and said,
‘My heart exults in the Lord;
   my strength is exalted in my God.
My mouth derides my enemies,
   because I rejoice in my victory.

2 ‘There is no Holy One like the Lord,
   no one besides you;
   there is no Rock like our God.
3 Talk no more so very proudly,
   let not arrogance come from your mouth;
for the Lord is a God of knowledge,
   and by him actions are weighed.
4 The bows of the mighty are broken,
   but the feeble gird on strength.
5 Those who were full have hired themselves out for bread,
   but those who were hungry are fat with spoil.
The barren has borne seven,
   but she who has many children is forlorn.
6 The Lord kills and brings to life;
   he brings down to Sheol and raises up.
7 The Lord makes poor and makes rich;
   he brings low, he also exalts.
8 He raises up the poor from the dust;
   he lifts the needy from the ash heap,
to make them sit with princes
   and inherit a seat of honour.
For the pillars of the earth are the Lord’s,
   and on them he has set the world.

9 ‘He will guard the feet of his faithful ones,
   but the wicked shall be cut off in darkness;
   for not by might does one prevail.
10 The Lord! His adversaries shall be shattered;
   the Most High will thunder in heaven.
The Lord will judge the ends of the earth;
   he will give strength to his king,
   and exalt the power of his anointed.’

Alternate: 
Psalm 16

1 Protect me, O God, for I take refuge in you; *
       I have said to the Lord, "You are my Lord,
       my good above all other."
2 All my delight is upon the godly that are in the land, *
       upon those who are noble among the people.
3 But those who run after other gods *
       shall have their troubles multiplied.
4 Their libations of blood I will not offer, *
       nor take the names of their gods upon my lips.
5 O Lord, you are my portion and my cup; *
       it is you who uphold my lot.
6 My boundaries enclose a pleasant land; *
       indeed, I have a goodly heritage.
7 I will bless the Lord who gives me counsel; *
       my heart teaches me, night after night.
8 I have set the Lord always before me; *
       because he is at my right hand I shall not fall.
9 My heart, therefore, is glad, and my spirit rejoices; *
       my body also shall rest in hope.
10 For you will not abandon me to the grave, *
       nor let your holy one see the Pit.
11 You will show me the path of life; *
       in your presence there is fullness of joy,
       and in your right hand are pleasures for evermore.

Epistle: 
Hebrews 10:11-14 (15-18) 19-25

11 And every priest stands day after day at his service, offering again and again the same sacrifices that can never take away sins. 12But when Christ had offered for all time a single sacrifice for sins, ‘he sat down at the right hand of God’, 13and since then has been waiting ‘until his enemies would be made a footstool for his feet.’ 14For by a single offering he has perfected for all time those who are sanctified. [15And the Holy Spirit also testifies to us, for after saying,
16 ‘This is the covenant that I will make with them
   after those days, says the Lord:
I will put my laws in their hearts,
   and I will write them on their minds’,
17he also adds,
‘I will remember their sins and their lawless deeds no more.’
18Where there is forgiveness of these, there is no longer any offering for sin.]

19 Therefore, my friends, since we have confidence to enter the sanctuary by the blood of Jesus, 20by the new and living way that he opened for us through the curtain (that is, through his flesh), 21and since we have a great priest over the house of God, 22let us approach with a true heart in full assurance of faith, with our hearts sprinkled clean from an evil conscience and our bodies washed with pure water. 23Let us hold fast to the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who has promised is faithful. 24And let us consider how to provoke one another to love and good deeds, 25not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day approaching.

Gospel: 
Mark 13:1-8

1 As he came out of the temple, one of his disciples said to him, ‘Look, Teacher, what large stones and what large buildings!’ 2Then Jesus asked him, ‘Do you see these great buildings? Not one stone will be left here upon another; all will be thrown down.’

When he was sitting on the Mount of Olives opposite the temple, Peter, James, John, and Andrew asked him privately, 4‘Tell us, when will this be, and what will be the sign that all these things are about to be accomplished?’ 5Then Jesus began to say to them, ‘Beware that no one leads you astray. 6Many will come in my name and say, “I am he!”* and they will lead many astray. 7When you hear of wars and rumours of wars, do not be alarmed; this must take place, but the end is still to come. 8For nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom; there will be earthquakes in various places; there will be famines. This is but the beginning of the birth pangs.

The Old Testament, New Testament and Gospels readings are from the New Revised Standard Version Bible: Anglicized Edition, copyright 1989, 1995, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

The Collects, Psalms and Canticles are from the Book of Common Prayer, 1979.

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Daily Readings ...

posted Jul 4, 2016, 6:42 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Nov 12, 2018, 4:01 PM ]



The daily readings expand the range of biblical reading in worship and personal devotion.  These readings complement the Sunday and festival readings: Monday through Wednesday readings help the reader reflect on and digest what they heard in worship on Sunday; Thursday through Saturday readings help prepare the reader for the Sunday ahead.

Source:  http://lectionary.library.vanderbilt.edu/daily.php?year=C#id264


Note: For the readings after Pentecost: the first reading pairs with the semi-continuous strand of texts; the second, with the complementary.





Sunday, November 11, 2018: Proper 27 (32)






Sunday, November 18, 2018: Proper 28 (33)





Reproduced from Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings copyright © 2005 Consultation on Common Texts admin. Augsburg Fortress. Used by permission. A complete edition of the Daily Readings is available though Augsburg Fortress.



Calvary News and Announcements ...

posted Jun 15, 2016, 4:07 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Sep 24, 2018, 8:42 AM ]








Diocesan Convention

Calvary Church will host the Friday Workshop.

November 16-17
The 228th Diocesan Convention of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina will be at Holy Communion, Charleston beginning Friday, November 16 and concluding Saturday, November 17. 


The location for the
228th Annual Convention:

Church of the Holy Communion
218 Ashley Ave.
Charleston, SC 29403
Website: holycomm.org

FRIDAY WORKSHOP
LOCATION:


Calvary Episcopal Church
106 Line St.
Charleston, SC 29403
Website: calvarych.org

Registration for the Friday workshop with Becca

Stevens is $25.00 and includes lunch. Attendance is encouraged, but optional. These workshops are open to everyone in the diocese. Lay leaders and clergy in parishes, missions and worship groups are encouraged to attend. The workshops will take place at Calvary Episcopal Church located at 106 Line Street. Please register by Tuesday, October 30, 2018.


CALVARY EPISCOPAL CHURCH WELCOMES REVEREND MATTHEW W. MCCORMICK AS THEIR NEW PRIEST-IN-CHARGE

The Vestry and Congregation of Calvary Episcopal Church is pleased to welcome the Reverend Matthew Wright McCormick as the new Priest-in-Charge at Calvary Church. Reverend "Matt" is gifted as a committed follower of Christ, a preacher and teacher, a dynamic worship leader, a man sensitive to and committed to multi-cultural ministry and a warm, vibrant welcoming pastor, who is well prepared and good at plugging people into ministries. He officially began in the office on Wednesday, August 1, 2018 and presided over his first service on Sunday, August 5.  The service was well attended as Calvary parishioners enthusiastically welcomed our new pastor.

Reverend McCormick grew up a cradle Episcopalian in the coastal city of Jacksonville, Florida. He graduated in 2001 from the College of Charleston and met his lovely wife, Lisa, during his early years working in the marketing and hospitality industry in our great city. He enjoys southern cooking, Charleston arts and music, great stories, and spending time with Lisa and their precious son, Colson.

Matt was ordained to the priesthood in 2008. He is a graduate of Trinity Episcopal School for Ministry in Ambridge, Pennsylvania; he has received a Masters of Theology degree from Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, and is currently working on doctoral studies. He has returned to Charleston with his family after serving as rector of Messiah Episcopal Church in St. Paul, Minnesota. Previously, he served as vicar of the Church of the Resurrection in North Charleston, South Carolina. Prior to that, he was an associate rector at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Charleston, a large congregation where he served in a variety of roles.

We prayerfully anticipate what God desires to do among us through Father Matt.





Renewal of Ordination Vows held at Calvary Church on February 20, 2018: 
The Bishop's Sermon

What role does memory play in the life of faith? Preaching at the annual renewal of ordination vows for clergy of our diocese, Bishop Skip Adams said that one of the central responsibilities of being a deacon, priest, or bishop "is to help the people of God to remember." 
Watch the video of the sermon and find the text of his sermon here.
Priests and deacons of our diocese gathered with Bishop Skip Adams at Calvary Episcopal Church in Charleston today to celebrate Holy Eucharist,
renew their ordination vows, and bless the oils used for baptism and healing.
This annual service is held during Lent, and we ask your prayers for all our clergy: Find a list at our website:



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House of Deputies Medal Awarded to Lonnie Hamilton




Lonnie Hamilton with the President of the House of Deputies, the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings,
onstage with the rest of the South Carolina deputation and Bishop Skip Adams.

On July 10, 2018,  the House of Deputies Medal was awarded to Lonnie Hamilton III, a lay deputy for South Carolina. House of Deputies President Gay Clark Jennings presented the award, honoring Lonnie's leadership and witness in serving the Church through a time of division and the ongoing reorganization in our diocese. Our deputation and Bishop Adams accompanied him to the stage as he received a standing ovation from more than 800 people present in the House of Deputies.



Watch the video here - the presentation begins at about 17:00 minutes.

Here is the text of President Jennings' presentation:

Now, back in 2012, we had a little excitement at General Convention. ... At that convention, held in the great diocese of Indianapolis, some of those gathered among us decided to leave the convention and, ultimately, to leave the Episcopal Church. Just one loyal Episcopalian from the former Diocese of South Carolina remained, and he is a gifted educator, a civil rights advocate, and an astonishing jazz saxophonist and clarinetist who has also been a faithful member of our church for more than 60 years. And through it all, he has never stopped working and praying and hoping that the people of his former diocese will find a way to come back together so that we all may be one."

Deputy Lonnie Hamilton of the Episcopal Church in South Carolina has been a member of Calvary Episcopal Church in Charleston for 57 years and served on the vestry, as choirmaster, and in many other leadership roles. He has served on the Standing Committee and the Diocesan Council in South Carolina, and this is his sixth General Convention as a deputy or alternate. He is a retired administrator with the Charleston County School District and served his community as a member of Charleston County Council for more than 20 years. He was the first African American to serve on that body and was twice elected as its chairman.

The House of Deputies is not, as you can imagine, the first organization to honor Lonnie’s faithful ministry. When he received the Dean’s Cross Award from Virginia Theological Seminary last year, the citation noted that Lonnie has “a reputation not only as a gifted educator but also as a charismatic figure who was popular with students and who could help ease tensions at Bonds-Wilson and other North Charleston area schools resulting from the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision. In the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo, he led the diocesan Community Housing Development Organization, which has converted dozens of properties into affordable housing units.”

As if all this weren’t enough, Lonnie toured with the Jenkins Orphanage Bands in the mid-1940s and played with his own band, Lonnie Hamilton and the Diplomats, which was the signature jazz band in Charleston for decades.

For his distinguished service to the Episcopal Church and to the community we serve in Charleston, South Carolina, I am honored to award the House of Deputies medal to Deputy Lonnie Hamilton.


~~~~~~~~


Our own Mr. Lonnie Hamilton III has been awarded the prestigious DEAN'S CROSS award by the Virginia Theological Seminary.

Established in November 2008, the Dean’s Cross award recognizes outstanding leaders who embody their baptismal vows to “strive for justice and peace among all people and respect the dignity of every human being.”  Selected annually by the Seminary Dean in consultation with the Chair of the Board, the Honorees receive a handmade silver cross, modeled after the Seminary Chapel cross, and a certificate.  

“Our work here at Virginia Seminary is formation,” said the Very Rev. Ian Markham, dean and president of Virginia Seminary, “and this award celebrates the well-formed life, which involves living out the values of the baptismal covenant and making a difference in society.”



                       
   Past Recipients of the award include:

   December 7, 2014
  • Ms. Madeleine Albright from Washington, D.C.
    Former (and the first female) Secretary of State of the United States of America

   December 6, 2015
  • Mrs. Barbara Bush from Houston, TX.
    Former First Lady of the United States of America




  • ON JULY 23, 2017, CALVARY CHURCH  WELCOMED MEMBERS OF ST. MARY'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH FROM WAYNE, PENNSYLVANIA
Fr. Joseph Smith, Rector, and Members of St. Mary's Episcopal Church in Wayne, PA  were in the Charleston area on July 23 for a mission trip with a group called Home Works. They worked primarily on John's Island, bringing around 22 youth and adults. Calvary extended our warmest welcome to these travelers to worship with us that Sunday. 

.

 




This was a return visit for the Youth Group and group leaders of St. Mary's to do their mission work on John's Island. 
Follow the link below to see pictures from last  year's visit.









ECW  FISH FRY on February 23    
The Episcopal Church Women (ECW) will host a  FISH FRY on Friday, February 23 from 4 - 6 pm.
Tickets are $10

Location: Calvary Church Parish Hall, 104 Line Street, Charleston SC 29403



ECW  OYSTER ROAST on April 7
The Episcopal Church Women will host their annual Oyster Roast on April 7, 2018 from 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm. 
Tickets are $20 adults and $10 children ages 6-12 years.
Location: Calvary Church Parish Hall, 104 Line Street, Charleston SC 29403



EpisComm18 is coming to Kanuga April 17-20

The national Episcopal Communicators Conference will be April 17-20, 2018 at Kanuga Episcopal Conference Center near Hendersonville NC. Registration is now open, and I am planning to attend this as well.  

Please consider attending (or sending someone to) this important national conference - both for the excellent workshops and speakers, and for the opportunity to meet people from all over The Episcopal Church who are doing this kind of work, too. You will come home with fresh inspiration, exciting ideas, and new friendships. 



~~~~~~~~






Our own Mr. Lonnie Hamilton III has been awarded the prestigious DEAN'S CROSS award by the Virginia Theological Seminary.

Established in November 2008, the Dean’s Cross award recognizes outstanding leaders who embody their baptismal vows to “strive for justice and peace among all people and respect the dignity of every human being.”  Selected annually by the Seminary Dean in consultation with the Chair of the Board, the Honorees receive a handmade silver cross, modeled after the Seminary Chapel cross, and a certificate.  

“Our work here at Virginia Seminary is formation,” said the Very Rev. Ian Markham, dean and president of Virginia Seminary, “and this award celebrates the well-formed life, which involves living out the values of the baptismal covenant and making a difference in society.”



                       
   Past Recipients of the award include:

   December 7, 2014
  • Ms. Madeleine Albright from Washington, D.C.
    Former (and the first female) Secretary of State of the United States of America

   December 6, 2015
  • Mrs. Barbara Bush from Houston, TX.
    Former First Lady of the United States of America




  • ON JULY 23, 2017, CALVARY CHURCH  WELCOMED MEMBERS OF ST. MARY'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH FROM WAYNE, PENNSYLVANIA
Fr. Joseph Smith, Rector, and Members of St. Mary's Episcopal Church in Wayne, PA  were in the Charleston area on July 23 for a mission trip with a group called Home Works. They worked primarily on John's Island, bringing around 22 youth and adults. Calvary extended our warmest welcome to these travelers to worship with us that Sunday. 

.

 




This was a return visit for the Youth Group and group leaders of St. Mary's to do their mission work on John's Island. 
Follow the link below to see pictures from last  year's visit.


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NEWS BLOG - AROUND THE DIOCESE - Events, Resources, Services

posted Jun 15, 2016, 2:30 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Oct 17, 2018, 7:00 PM ]

Clergy Transitions

10/16/2018

 
Picture
Bishop Adams and the Wardens and Vestry of St. James-Santee, McClellanville have announced that the Reverend Jill Williams will be the new Vicar of St. James-Santee beginning on the First Sunday of Advent, December 2. 

The Rev. Williams is the Lower School Chaplain at Porter-Gaud, an Episcopal school in Charleston, and will continue to serve in that capacity. Previously she has served as associate rector of St. Francis Episcopal Church in Holden, Mass., and as missioner for Christian formation for the Diocese of Western Massachusetts.
She holds a BA in Theatre and English from Florida Southern College and a Master of Divinity from Virginia Theological Seminary. She and her husband Andrew have two school-age sons. 

The Reverend Caroline Goodkind will continue as interim vicar at St. James-Santee until December. 

 
Picture
Autumn concerts and services around the diocese offer opportunities to celebrate new beginnings, mark the Feast of All Saints, and remember those who have gone before. Here are some events planned in Episcopal churches this fall.

Sunday, October 21
St. Stephen's, Charleston: Communitywide Interfaith Pride Service, with a musical prelude beginning at 4:30 pm. Service begins at 5:00 p.m.

Friday, October 26
All Saints, Hilton Head Island: Rededication Concert for the All Saints organ, with Dr. Patrick Hawkins, organist, playing works from the Baroque to 20th century. 7:00 pm. Read a news article about the concert series.

Thursday, November 1 - All Saints' Day
Church of the Holy Communion, Charleston: Solemn High Mass for All Saints at 6:30 pm.
Grace Church Cathedral, Charleston: Holy Eucharist for All Saints's Day at 12:00 pm

Sunday, November 4 - All Saints Sunday
Grace Church Cathedral, Charleston: Choral Evensong for All Saints and All Souls, 4:00 p.m., with the St. Gregory Choir.

Holy Cross Faith Memorial, Pawleys Island: 
All Saints Evensong of Remembrance at 5:00 pm, in memory of all those in the community who have died in the past year.  

Sunday, November 11
Grace Church Cathedral: Veterans' Day Concert: 'Music for the Greatest Generation,' 4:00 pm with the St. Gregory Choir.

St. Stephen's, Charleston, A Bernstein Choral Evensong with works of Leonard Bernstein, 5:00 pm

 
Memorandums, responses and replies have been filed as requested by Judge Edgar Dickson in the 1st Judicial Circuit, and all parties now await a hearing date on how the court will proceed with implementing the South Carolina Supreme Court decision on church properties.

The latest documents, filed on October 12 by The Episcopal Church and The Episcopal Church in South Carolina, ask the court to move forward with giving control of diocesan property and the property of 29 parishes to The Episcopal Church, as the Supreme Court decided in August 2017, remitting its decision to the 1st Judicial Circuit to be implemented.

"This Court has jurisdiction upon remittitur to enforce the mandate of the South Carolina Supreme Court, not to unravel it," according to the Omnibus Reply Brief filed by TEC and TECSC.

The legal filings also note that the breakaway group now acknowledges “they have repudiated their roles as trustees” in their Opposition to Motion to Dismiss the Betterment Action.

In September, Judge Dickson notified attorneys that he plans to hear all motions and petitions during the weeks of October 22 and 29. A specific hearing date has not yet been assigned.

In preparation for the hearing, the judge asked parties to file memorandums by September 24, which they did.  Next were responses to those memorandums, which were filed earlier in October as follows:  

Plaintiff’s Response in Opposition – Petition for an Accounting
Plaintif’s Response in Opposition – Petition for Execution
Plaintiff’s Response in Opposition – Motion to Dismiss
TECSC Brief in Opposition – Complex Case Designation
TECSC Brief in Opposition – Motion for Clarification & Further Relief
 
Replies to the response briefs were filed as follows:  
Plaintiff’s Reply – Motion for Clarification & Further Relief
TECSC Omnibus Reply Brief – Petitions for Enforcement, Accounting, and Motion to Dismiss
 
If you've never watched an event on Facebook Live, here 's a short video and some information about how to join our Live Open Conversation on October 11. 
 
 
At the Smith Medical Clinic on the campus of Holy Cross Faith Memorial, Pawleys Island, a check is presented to Anne Faul, executive director. With the Rev. Jason Roberson and the Rev. Rob Donehue of HCFM.
 
Churches around the diocese are still working hard to help our neighbors in the Pee Dee-Waccamaw Deanery whose homes have been damaged or lost in the catastrophic flooding following Hurricane Florence. 

Churches in the area have been stepping up their long-standing outreach partnerships with organizations that provide food and other relief, including Helping Hands ministries in the Grand Strand area. And churches in other parts of the diocese are collecting money and goods, and beginning to organize volunteers.

On October 5, Diocesan Ministry Developer Andrea McKellar and the Rev. Rob Donehue of St. Anne's, Conway visited several sites, including the James R. Frazier Recreation Center in Bucksport, where they delivered a pallet of flood buckets donated by the United Methodist Church, and about $500 in gift cards to help people buy necessities.

According to Fr. Donehue, Bucksport is one of the hardest hit areas in the state, and many of the residents of Bucksport are going to be out of their homes for a long time. Rob and Andrea met with local leaders including the Rev. Cheryl Adamson from Palmetto Missionary Baptist Church, a long-time friend and partner in ministry with St. Anne's; Betty Gause, head volunteer and associate director at the rec center, and "Mother Mary" Moore, the Rev. Adamson's mother.

Archdeacon Callie Walpole was at St. Anne's to celebrate and preach on October 7. She and Fr. Donehue were joined by Lura Steele and The Rev. Canon Carl Andrews of Episcopal Relief & Development, who are assisting with the organization's "boots on the ground" efforts in the region and attended the service. They gave the congregation an updatte on the work Episcopal Relief & Development has been doing in hard-hit areas of the Carolinas.  

Ways you can help

A Diocesan Disaster Relief Fund has been established for donations to be used specifically within our diocese for flooding and other disaster relief. To make a gift online, click here and choose "Disaster Relief " as the selected fund. Checks also can be sent to the Diocesan Office, with "Disaster Relief" in the memo line, to PO Box 20485, Charleston, SC, 29413.

Episcopal Relief and Development also continues to collect donations for its Hurricane Relief Fund, which benefits areas in the Carolinas affected by Florence and other storm-ravaged communities. Make a donation here.

Volunteers can help with removing debris and damaged building materials at homes. People can use Episcopal Relief & Development's Ready to Serve signup form. 
 
The Right Reverend Gladstone B. (Skip) Adams III
Skip Adams was elected by acclamation and invested as Provisional Bishop of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina on September 10, 2016. Previously he served as the 10th Bishop of Central New York, the diocese that covers the central portion of the state of New York, retiring in 2016 after 15 years of service. A native of Baltimore, Maryland, he is a graduate of Towson University and Virginia Theological Seminary. After his ordination in 1980 he served churches in New York, Virginia, New Hampshire and Maryland. He enjoys fly-fishing and fly-tying, reading, music of all kinds, camping and canoeing. He is interested in the Church and people in El Salvador, and serves on the board of Cristosal, an organization that works to advance human rights in Central America. His wife Bonnie is a registered nurse, and they have three adult children and two grandchildren. 

Hillery Douglas
Hillery Douglas is a member of the Diocesan Council. He has served as a leader and singer for many years at St. Mark's in downtown Charleston. In 2012, he joined with other Episcopalians on the Steering Committee that helped reorganize the diocese, and served as its chairman. Hillery graduated from Allen University and taught science at W. Gresham-Meggett High School on James Island, where he coached the football team to a state championship. He worked as a chemist at the Charleston Naval Shipyard for 29 years and for 21 years he has owned and operated Earth Sciences Laboratory in North Charleston. Hillery served on many community boards, including 16 years on the Charleston County School Board, four of those as chairman. He and his wife Yvette have five grown children, 16 grandchildren and a great-grandchild

The Venerable
Calhoun (Callie) Walpole

Callie Walpole is Archdeacon of the diocese and vicar and subdean of Grace Church Cathedral, where she has served since 2009. A native of John’s Island, she grew up as a member of St. John’s Episcopal Church. She has taught Spanish at Burke High School and at Bishop England. Callie attended seminary at the University of the South, and served as assistant rector of Holy Cross Faith Memorial Episcopal Church on Pawley’s Island from 2005-2009. She also served half-time as priest-in-charge at St. Mark's in Charleston in 2012-13 while serving as vicar at Grace. She was appointed archdeacon in March 2013, and serves as secretary to Diocesan Convention and as a resource person for other diocesan programs. Her hobbies include crabbing, reading, history, writing, and walking.

Andrea McKellar
Andrea McKellar is Ministry Developer on the Bishop’s staff. Her responsibilities include transition ministry, working with individuals and congregations through times of discernment and calling. She also is responsible for leadership development, Christian formation and youth ministry. Andrea joined the staff in January 2014 after serving as Director of Christian Formation at Old St. Andrews in West Ashley from 2011-13. Andrea grew up in coastal Virginia and moved to Charleston upon graduation from the College of William & Mary in 2000. In July, she was elected to a 3-year term on the Executive Council of The Episcopal Church, and she is on the board of Forma, a national grassroots Christian formation organization. A lifelong Episcopalian, Andrea worships at St. Francis Episcopal Church in the West Ashley area of Charleston. Andrea and her husband Mark live in West Ashley with their two children. 

The Rev. William (Bill) Coyne
Bill Coyne was appointed in June 2018 as Missioner for Returning Congregations, a new staff position working directly with Bishop Adams to assist parishes and missions that are returning to The Episcopal Church. Bill has served as a priest in the diocese since August 2015, when he was called as interim rector of St. Stephen’s, Charleston. He led that parish for two years through their successful call of a new rector last summer. In August 2017 he was named priest-in-charge of The East Cooper Episcopal Church, and is continuing in that role alongside his new responsibilities. Before coming to Charleston, Bill served for 15 years as Archdeacon of the Diocese of Western Massachusetts, retiring in 2013 and then serving in two interim positions before he and his wife Janet moved to Charleston. The Coynes have three grown children and five grandchildren.

 
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The Rev. Bill Coyne (left) and Bishop Skip Adams meet to talk about preparations for the Facebook Live Open Conversation they will participate in on October 11 along with three other panelists.

​Building on the three “Open Conversations” held in Conway, Charleston and Bluffton in July, 2018, The Episcopal Church in South Carolina will take a new step in the holy work of reconciliation with an online "Live Open Conversation" on October 11 on Facebook Live, the Rev. William Coyne says.

"This new event offers the possibility and promise of even more engagement from folks around the diocese and the churches of eastern South Carolina," says Fr. Coyne, who is Missioner for Returning Congregations for The Episcopal Church in South Carolina.

Fr. Coyne recently reported to the Diocesan Council about this exciting new opportunity to use Facebook Live as an avenue for conversations with people who have questions and concerns.

“As we await the court setting in motion the implementation plan and timeline for returning congregations, we will continue to listen, share information, and collect contacts of those who wish to be partners in building the new future together,” Fr. Coyne told the Council.

The Live Open Conversation format allows the opportunity to listen deeply and talk to people in the pews, Fr. Coyne says. In keeping with same summer Open Conversation theme, participants will be not required to identify themselves or their churches, but may chose to do so. To participate, people can simply visit the TECSC Facebook page, www.facebook.com/episcopalchurchsc, on October 11 at 6:30 pm.

Contact Fr. Coyne at wcoyne@episcopalchurchsc.org or 843-614-0679. You also can learn more about reconciliation in our diocese by reading the Frequently Asked Questions document.

 
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Prayer shared on the Facebook page of Church of the Messiah, Myrtle Beach.
​Aided by private donations and an emergency grant from Episcopal Relief & Development, the Episcopal Church in South Carolina is responding to needs in the Pee Dee-Waccamaw Deanery of the diocese as flooding continues to ravage communities in our state following Hurricane Florence.

The Rev. Rob Donehue, priest-in-charge of St. Anne’s Episcopal Church, Conway, served as the lead in applying for a short-term relief grant on behalf of our diocese from Episcopal Relief & Development. An initial amount of $11,000 was approved Thursday. In the application, Fr. Donehue shared needs in Horry and Georgetown counties and detailed ways that the grant could help the flooded communities.

"I spoke with one woman in her 80s who told me that she doesn’t think she’ll have a home to return to," Fr. Donehue says. "She said that most of her neighbors will have lost everything and don’t know what they’ll do, but 'by the grace of God, we’ll get through.'" (Read a report from Fr. Donehue below.)

Some of the organizations that were named in the grant are Shepherd’s Table, a soup kitchen in Conway, Helping Hands of Georgetown, Smith Medical Clinic in Pawley’s Island, and Waccamaw Animal Rescue Clinic.

Additional funding to support the area is coming from private donations, including a large anonymous gift to our diocesan Disaster Relief Fund, Bishop Skip Adams said.

"We are so grateful to this generous donor for helping us reach out to our neighbors who are suffering because of flooding," Bishop Adams said. "We're also thankful for the assistance we are receiving from Episcopal Relief & Development, and for all the people and churches here and across the Church who continue to give so generously in the aftermath of Florence."

Ways to give:
Diocesan Disaster Relief Fund & Episcopal Relief & Development 


A Diocesan Disaster Relief Fund has been established for donations to be used specifically within our diocese for flooding and other disaster relief. To make a gift online, click here and choose "Disaster Relief " as the selected fund. Checks also can be sent to the Diocesan Office, with "Disaster Relief" in the memo line, to PO Box 20485, Charleston, SC, 29413.

Episcopal Relief and Development also continues to collect donations for its Hurricane Relief Fund, which benefits areas in the Carolinas affected by Florence and other storm-ravaged communities. Make a donation here.

Volunteers may be needed soon to help with removing debris and damaged building materials at homes. People can use Episcopal Relief & Development's Ready to Serve signup form. 

A report from Conway

The Rev. Rob Donehue, priest-in-charge of St. Anne's, Conway, wrote this email Wednesday night about the situation in communities affected by flooding, and how assistance to the disaster relief fund can help.

I went today to the Whittemore Park Middle School in Conway. It has been turned into a shelter for folks who were evacuated from the Bucksport community. Bucksport is almost completely flooded - for the third time in four years. The people there are getting by as best they can, but the facilities at the school are far from adequate. For the first five days, there was no hot water. A church brought in a mobile shower unit, but it’s barely meeting the need. 

With the school district hoping to get students back in school as soon as possible, it is likely that people will have to be moved to another facility within a week. But even the Red Cross workers don’t know where that might be. The simple reality is that Bucksport residents will be in emergency shelters for many weeks before they can even begin to think about returning to their community to rebuild.

I spoke with one woman in her 80s who told me that she doesn’t think she’ll have a home to return to. She said that most of her neighbors will have lost everything and don’t know what they’ll do, but “by the grace of God, we’ll get through.”

Another Bucksport evacuee sheltering at the school told me his home was severely damaged in the flood after hurricane Matthew. FEMA gave him $12k for it, but that didn’t even cover half of the repair expenses. He took out a loan, which he is nowhere near paying off, and he only recently finished repairing his house when Florence struck. He can’t afford to take out another loan now and does not know what his future looks like. Those are just two stories from the @150 refugees at just the one facility I visited today. There are undoubtedly many similar stories.

Most of the residents of Bucksport live below the poverty line and do not have flood insurance. 

I spoke with my contacts from CAP, Shepherd’s Table, and ECHO today, and they are all worried that, even with assistance from state-run food banks, they are going to run out of food within a week. People are coming to these organizations asking for help with gas money, rent money, etc., and there simply isn’t enough funding to meet the needs. 

New Directions in Myrtle Beach is being completely overwhelmed by the calls for assistance. Their homeless shelter in Myrtle Beach is full, and they are having to turn people away. Most of the people they are seeing are not homeless in the conventional sense - they are poor and flooded out with nowhere else to go. The director of the facility said that if they had the funds to put people in a hotel even for one night, they would be happy to do that. FEMA housing will likely alleviate some of the problem, but that’s not in place yet. 

As we were wrapping up noonday prayer at the First United Methodist Church, a fawn ran across Main Street and through the churchyard where we had our service. I learned later that it crashed through a window at the Dollar General three blocks away. This story is a good example of what happens when wildlife is displaced by flooding, and I think it highlights the problems that animal shelters across the county are dealing with. When the waters rise, we tend to forget that it’s not just people that are displaced. 

The Episcopal Relief & Development grant will help us to provide some people with a sense that there is solid ground to stand on and that it hasn’t all been washed away in the flood waters. It’s a good thing to be able to tell people that we are here for them, but it’s an even better thing to be able to show them that we really mean what we say. 

I communicated with the Rev. Jason Roberson, the Rev. Randy Ferebee, Charlie Jordan, Mary Jeffcoat, and the Rev. Cn. Dr. Wilmot Merchant [leaders of area Episcopal churches] to get an idea of who needs immediate help. Their input was invaluable for identifying aid agencies in Horry and Georgetown counties that are struggling to meet people’s needs. 

Pax,
Rob 
 
The Episcopal Church in South Carolina (TECSC) will continue the Open Conversation series with a Facebook Live Open Conversation on October 11, 2018 from 6:30-7:45 p.m.

TECSC coordinated this live open conversation in response to the three previous Open Conversations held in July in Bluffton, Conway and Charleston.

“I invite everyone to join me and four other leaders in The Episcopal Church in South Carolina for the opportunity to ask questions and share ideas,” said the Right Rev. Gladstone B. Adams III, Bishop of TECSC. “This is an effort to keep an open flow of communication among all the people who care deeply about the Episcopal/Anglican churches in this part of South Carolina.”

The Facebook Live Open Conversation is hosted by five panel members who will respond to the most frequently asked questions, as well as questions that can be offered online throughout the live video. The panel includes:
  • Bishop Skip Adams of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina
  • The Rev. Bill Coyne, Diocesan Missioner for Returning Congregations
  • Hillery Douglas of St. Mark's Episcopal Church in Charleston and a member of Diocesan Council
  • Andrea McKellar, Diocesan Ministry Developer
  • Archdeacon Callie Walpole, staff member at the Diocesan Office and Grace Church Cathedral
“My hope is that this conversation and events like it will provide pathways for the Holy Spirit to act through open hearts and minds, to bring about the highest degree of reconciliation possible ‘on earth as it is in heaven,’” Bishop Adams said.  

To view the live open conversation and engage with the panel, visit the TECSC Facebook page: facebook.com/episcopalchurchsc. The online meeting with the community will be a vital step on the path to reconciliation. Information regarding the Live Open Conversation will be posted to the TECSC Facebook page.

For more information, view A Historical Timeline of the Episcopal Church in South Carolina and the Frequently Asked Questions.
 
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The Rev. Dr. Donald Fishburne, left, and the Rev. William Coyne, right, participate in the "Thriving in Ministry" conference in September.
Two priests from The Episcopal Church in South Carolina recently traveled to Virginia Theological Seminary to participate in a new initiative called "Thriving in Ministry," preparing them to bring training and support to the clergy who will serve congregations that are returning to The Episcopal Church.

The Rev. William Coyne, Diocesan Missioner for Returning Congregations, and The Rev. Dr. Donald Fishburne, priest associate at Holy Cross Faith Memorial, Pawleys Island, completed the program at VTS in Alexandria, VA earlier this month. Their training will bring clergy who serve returning congregations access to the gift and expectation that they will be active participants in a "peer group learning environment." This process will support the vitality of the congregations they serve, according to Fr. Coyne.

The Thriving Initiative, supported by the Lilly Endowment, Inc., will serve as a catalyst to form Peer Learning Groups by providing tools so that South Carolina participants can identify and pursue their learning goals in ministry. 'Thriving' trained a cohort of Group Facilitators, including Fr. Coyne, and mentors including Fr. Fishburne, in new skills,  so that along with the peer group learning experience, each participant may choose to have a mentor.  


“I’m excited by the depth and breadth of the scope of this robust initiative, and the strong resources now available to us,” Fr. Fishburne said. "This new program will initially strengthen clergy, and through them — and ultimately through expansions of the program — lay professionals and lay leaders in congregations will also benefit."
 
Thriving in Ministry is a strong collaboration of church practitioners and seminary leaders. The Rev. Dr. David Gortner of the VTS faculty is the Principal Investigator for the program.  Its director, the Rev. Dr. Carol Pinkham Oak, draws upon her experience in parish ministry. Imani Kane is the Program Administrator for the program with her knowledge of community organizing, mentoring teens, and not-for-profit scholarship programs. ​Learn more about Thriving in Ministry here.

For information about returning congregations and The Episcopal Church in South Carolina, contact Fr. Coyne: 
wcoyne@episcopalchurchsc.org or (843) 614-0679.

Upcoming Events & Activities Around the Diocese

posted May 23, 2016, 3:48 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Aug 21, 2018, 11:44 AM ]

TECSC News Blog

CPG 'Planning for Wellness' Conference

September 13-14 in North Charleston
The Church Pension Group (CPG) offers a "Planning for Wellness" conference for all active clergy in The Episcopal Church in South Carolina. This will be at the North Charleston Marriott. Save the date; registration information coming soon.  

Social Media Sunday

September 30, 2018 across the diocese
An annual Sunday that helps draw attention to how Christians can share the Good News through Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and other social media. Bring your smartphone or tablet to church! Learn about #SMS18 here. 

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Diocesan Convention

November 16-17
The 228th Diocesan Convention of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina will be at Holy Communion, Charleston beginning Friday, November 16 and concluding Saturday, November 17. More details will come when the Call to Convention is issued in August.



The location for the
228th Annual Convention:

Church of the Holy Communion
218 Ashley Ave.
Charleston, SC 29403
Website: holycomm.org

FRIDAY WORKSHOP
LOCATION:


Calvary Episcopal Church
106 Line St.
Charleston, SC 29403
Website: calvarych.org


Call to Convention
November 16-17, 2018

“Faith, Hope, and Love”


Notice is hereby given that the Annual Convention of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina will be held at the Church of the Holy Communion in Charleston, South Carolina on November 16-17, 2018. Our theme will be “Faith, Hope, and Love.”

We are delighted to have Becca Stevens, an Episcopal priest, social entrepreneur, speaker and author, as our convention speaker and workshop leader. The founder and president of Thistle Farms, a global community of survivors of trafficking and addiction that includes justice enterprises, she is widely honored her for work as an entrepreneur and justice advocate.

As usual, Diocesan Convention this year will present opportunities to accomplish two primary goals: to do the necessary work for our diocese at its annual convention and to participate in the annual reunion of the people of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina.

Three Deanery Meetings are being scheduled prior to Convention. These meetings are to include all clergy, delegates and alternates for the Convention. Attendance at these meetings is important, as they are the venue for:
  • Discussion of the 2019 program and budget
  • Introduction of nominees for diocesan offices
  • Proposed resolutions

Southern Deanery: Saturday, October 6 at 10:30 a.m. at St. Mark's, Port Royal.

Peninsula Charleston/West Charleston: Wednesday, October 10 at 7:00 p.m. at Church of the Holy Communion, Charleston

Pee Dee-Waccamaw:  Sunday, October 14 at 3:00 p.m. at Church of the Messiah, Myrtle Beach.

**If you cannot attend the meeting scheduled for your deanery, you are welcome to attend another one.

Preliminary Convention Schedule 
(subject to change prior to November 16)

Friday, November 16 
9:00 a.m. Workshop Registration Opens (at Calvary Episcopal Church)
10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Workshop led by Becca Stevens
1:00 p.m. Registration Opens
2:00-5:40 p.m. Break-Out Informational Sessions


  • 2:00 – 2:30 p.m. Constitution & Canons
  • 2:30 – 3:00 p.m. Resolutions Committee
  • 3:20 – 3:50 p.m. Budget
  • 4:00 – 4:30 p.m. Delegate Orientation
  • 4:40 – 5:10 p.m. General Convention Roundtable
  • 5:10 – 5:40 p.m. Meet the Nominees
  • 6:00 p.m. Call to Order, followed immediately by Convention Eucharist. The Right Reverend Gladstone Adams, Preacher and Celebrant
  • 7:30 p.m. Welcome Dinner (included with delegate and visitor registration)

Saturday, November 17
​8:00 a.m.  Late registration/check-in. Coffee and light breakfast (included with registration)
9:00 a.m. Morning Prayer followed by morning business session.
12:00 p.m. Box lunches served (included with registration)
1:00 p.m. Afternoon business session
 
Elections at Convention

The Convention will hold elections for the following positions:
  • Standing Committee: 2 lay members and 2 clergy members, 3 year terms
  • Diocesan Council: 2 lay members and 2 clergy members, 3 year terms
  • University of the South Board of Trustees: 1 clergy member, 3 year term
  • Trustees of The Episcopal Church in South Carolina: 3 lay members and 3 clergy members, term varies

All nominations must have the approval of the person being nominated, and must be received by the Secretary of Convention by Monday, September 17, 2018, in order to be included in preconvention materials. Nominators must be members of the Convention (lay delegates or members of the clergy). Available online are the Notice of Elections and the Nomination Form. (A printable nomination form is available here.)

Resolutions

Members of the Diocese are invited to submit resolutions for consideration at the Convention. These must follow the format and guidelines described in the Notice of Submittal of Resolutions, which is available here. All resolutions must be received by the Secretary of Convention no later than Monday, September 17, 2018, in order to be included in pre-convention materials.  

Resolutions affecting the Constitution and Canons must be submitted to the Committee on Constitutions and Canons. These also must be received by September 17, 2018. All may be submitted to convention@episcopalchurchsc.org.

Registration Procedures

Each Parish and Mission is asked to register online, and register all their delegates, alternates and clergy at one time. Clergy who are not directly affiliated with a delegation may register individually. Visitors may register with the delegation or on their own. The online registration link can be found here. Registration cost is $75 per delegate, $50 per visitor, $30 for Friday night Eucharist and dinner only. Payment may be made online or sent to the Diocesan Office by mail.

Registration materials for clergy and delegates must be received by the diocesan office by 12:00 pm Friday, October 5.

Visitors, including the news media, are welcome to attend all convention events, but must be registered in advance by Tuesday, October 30. A visitor registration charge of $50 is required for meals and printed materials. Late registrations after the deadline will be an additional $10 per person.

Registration for the Friday workshop with Becca Stevens is $25.00 and includes lunch. Attendance is encouraged, but optional. These workshops are open to everyone in the diocese. Lay leaders and clergy in parishes, missions and worship groups are encouraged to attend. The workshops will take place at Calvary Episcopal Church located at 106 Line Street. Please register by Tuesday, October 30, 2018. 


All canonically resident clergy serving in a parish are expected to attend the annual diocesan convention. Please make it a priority on your calendar from year to year. Normally, only a parish or family emergency requiring your attention should intervene. If you do need to be absent from convention and believe you have an otherwise compelling reason, it is expected that a letter stating the reason and asking permission to be absent be sent to the Bishop.

Hotel Accommodations

Clergy and delegates are responsible for making their own arrangements for lodging, if needed.

Rooms at several price-points have been reserved for the Convention on November 16. To secure these special Convention rates, contact these hotels directly by October 15. (The reserved rooms will be released after that time and the rates may not be honored.) If you need financial assistance, please contact the Diocesan Office.

A list of hotel rates and contact information can be found here.

+     +     +

I look forward to welcoming you to Convention in November.

Peace in Christ,

Callie

The Venerable Calhoun Walpole, Archdeacon
Secretary of Convention

CALVARY EPISCOPAL CHURCH WELCOMES REVEREND MATTHEW W. MCCORMICK

posted Mar 13, 2016, 11:55 AM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jul 21, 2018, 4:46 PM by joan bonaparte ]

CALVARY EPISCOPAL CHURCH WELCOMES REVEREND MATTHEW W. MCCORMICK AS THEIR NEW PRIEST-IN-CHARGE

The Vestry and Congregation of Calvary Episcopal Church is pleased to welcome the Reverend Matthew Wright McCormick as the new Priest-in-Charge at Calvary Church. Reverend "Matt" is gifted as a committed follower of Christ, a preacher and teacher, a dynamic worship leader, a man sensitive to and committed to multi-cultural ministry and a warm, vibrant welcoming pastor, who is well prepared and good at plugging people into ministries. He will officially begin in the office on Wednesday, August 1, 2018 and preside over his first service on Sunday, August 5. A welcome reception will follow the service.

Reverend McCormick grew up a cradle Episcopalian in the coastal city of Jacksonville, Florida. He graduated in 2001 from the College of Charleston and met his lovely wife, Lisa, during his early years working in the marketing and hospitality industry in our great city. He enjoys southern cooking, Charleston arts and music, great stories, and spending time with Lisa and their precious son, Colson.

Matt was ordained to the priesthood in 2008. He is a graduate of Trinity Episcopal School for Ministry in Ambridge, Pennsylvania; he has received a Masters of Theology degree from Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, and is currently working on doctoral studies. He has returned to Charleston with his family after serving as rector of Messiah Episcopal Church in St. Paul, Minnesota. Previously, he served as vicar of the Church of the Resurrection in North Charleston, South Carolina. Prior to that, he was an associate rector at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Charleston, a large congregation where he served in a variety of roles.

We prayerfully anticipate what God desires to do among us through Father Matt.




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HOUSE OF DEPUTIES MEDAL AWARDED TO LONNIE HAMILTON

posted Feb 1, 2016, 4:42 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jul 21, 2018, 5:08 PM by joan bonaparte ]

House of Deputies Medal Awarded to Lonnie Hamilton





Lonnie Hamilton with the President of the House of Deputies, the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings,
onstage with the rest of the South Carolina deputation and Bishop Skip Adams.

On July 10, the House of Deputies Medal was awarded to Lonnie Hamilton III, a lay deputy for South Carolina. House of Deputies President Gay Clark Jennings presented the award, honoring Lonnie's leadership and witness in serving the Church through a time of division and the ongoing reorganization in our diocese. Our deputation and Bishop Adams accompanied him to the stage as he received a standing ovation from more than 800 people present in the House of Deputies.

Watch the video here - the presentation begins at about 17:00 minutes.

Here is the text of President Jennings' presentation:

Now, back in 2012, we had a little excitement at General Convention. ... At that convention, held in the great diocese of Indianapolis, some of those gathered among us decided to leave the convention and, ultimately, to leave the Episcopal Church. Just one loyal Episcopalian from the former Diocese of South Carolina remained, and he is a gifted educator, a civil rights advocate, and an astonishing jazz saxophonist and clarinetist who has also been a faithful member of our church for more than 60 years. And through it all, he has never stopped working and praying and hoping that the people of his former diocese will find a way to come back together so that we all may be one."

Deputy Lonnie Hamilton of the Episcopal Church in South Carolina has been a member of Calvary Episcopal Church in Charleston for 57 years and served on the vestry, as choirmaster, and in many other leadership roles. He has served on the Standing Committee and the Diocesan Council in South Carolina, and this is his sixth General Convention as a deputy or alternate. He is a retired administrator with the Charleston County School District and served his community as a member of Charleston County Council for more than 20 years. He was the first African American to serve on that body and was twice elected as its chairman.

The House of Deputies is not, as you can imagine, the first organization to honor Lonnie’s faithful ministry. When he received the Dean’s Cross Award from Virginia Theological Seminary last year, the citation noted that Lonnie has “a reputation not only as a gifted educator but also as a charismatic figure who was popular with students and who could help ease tensions at Bonds-Wilson and other North Charleston area schools resulting from the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision. In the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo, he led the diocesan Community Housing Development Organization, which has converted dozens of properties into affordable housing units.”

As if all this weren’t enough, Lonnie toured with the Jenkins Orphanage Bands in the mid-1940s and played with his own band, Lonnie Hamilton and the Diplomats, which was the signature jazz band in Charleston for decades.

For his distinguished service to the Episcopal Church and to the community we serve in Charleston, South Carolina, I am honored to award the House of Deputies medal to Deputy Lonnie Hamilton.





Frequently Asked Questions is now available online.

posted Oct 26, 2015, 8:07 AM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jul 23, 2018, 2:40 PM ]

(Updated July 16, 2018)
Read, download and share here.


UPDATED FAQ NOW AVAILABLE


We invite you to explore our new “Frequently Asked Questions” supplement. This is offered to provide information and share hope for a future that remains grounded in the love of God in the reconciliation in the diocese and the churches of eastern South Carolina.. ​
Read, download & share it here. >

The "Frequently Asked Questions" document published by our diocese in May has been updated, and is now available online. The new version includes important updates, such as the contact information for our Missioner for Returning Congregations, the Rev. William Coyne. Please read, download and share this supplement with anyone you know who has questions.



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Prayers for Presiding Bishop Michael Curry

posted Oct 23, 2015, 9:04 AM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Aug 7, 2018, 12:09 PM ]


Presiding Bishop Michael Curry resting after cancer surgery

Posted on: August 1, 2018 10:17 AM   http://www.anglicannews.org/news/2018/08/presiding-bishop-michael-curry-resting-after-cancer-surgery.aspx
Presiding Bishop Michael Curry of the US-based Episcopal Church.
Photo Credit: TEC
Related Categories: Abp Curry, health, prayer, Primates, USA

The Presiding Bishop of the US-based Episcopal Church, Michael Curry, is resting comfortably after surgery yesterday (Tuesday) following a diagnosis of prostate cancer. Bishop Michael announced last week in an open letter published by TEC’s Public Affairs office that he had decided on surgical treatment “after a variety of tests, consultations, and conversations with my wife and daughters.” The surgery was to remove his prostate gland and in last week’s statement, Bishop Michael said that “the prognosis looks very good and quite positive.”

Yesterday, TEC issued a statement in which they said: “According to the presiding bishop’s family and his medical team, the surgery went well, as had been expected. Bishop Curry is resting, and a full recovery continues to be anticipated.”

They said that Bishop Michael “and his family are touched by the outpouring of prayers and well wishes. In their thankfulness, they ask for privacy during his recovery.”

The Presiding Bishop anticipates resuming his duties in September.




Presiding Bishop to have surgery for prostate cancer

'The prognosis looks very good and quite positive'

Posted Jul 25, 2018
https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2018/07/25/presiding-bishop-to-have-surgery-for-prostate-cancer/

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry



[Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] Presiding Bishop Michael Curry announced July 25 that he will soon undergo surgery for prostate cancer.


Dear Friends in Christ,

A few months ago, through my annual physical, I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. After a variety of tests, consultations, and conversations with my wife and daughters, I decided on a surgical treatment course. On this coming Tuesday, July 31st, I will have surgery to remove the prostate gland.

I am happy to say that the prognosis looks very good and quite positive. I have spoken with several others who have gone through this, and who have offered both encouragement and helpful advice. I will be in the hospital for at least a day, then at home to recuperate.

I’ve been told that 4-6 weeks is a reasonable time to anticipate. I plan to resume my duties in early September and I do not anticipate any significant changes in my commitments.

I am very blessed with a wonderful family, a first-rate medical team, a great staff, dear colleagues and friends, a calling to which I have given my life, and above all a good, great and loving God in whose hands we always remain. So, do say a prayer. And know that I look forward to being back at my post in September.

God bless you, and keep the faith,

+Michael

The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry
Presiding Bishop and Primate
The Episcopal Church

 




The Gathering at the Table Group meets on Tuesdays 5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

posted Sep 28, 2015, 2:19 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Mar 10, 2018, 2:23 AM ]







The Gathering at the Table group was formed through the initiative of Judith Ewing, an Episcopal deacon who serves at East Cooper Episcopal Church.  She sought out the Rev. Michael Burton, a supply priest at Calvary, about setting up an initial gathering.  Members of Calvary Episcopal Church and members of East Cooper Episcopal Church meet in the Calvary Church Parish Hall each Tuesday evening to share their perspectives on matters of race - past and present. 

Originally scheduled to meet for four weeks in October, 2015, the group has bonded and grown in their commitment.  They continue to meet, entertaining lively and healing discussions.  All are invited and encouraged to attend.




  • The Gatherers visited the National Museum of African American History in Washington, DC on August 28 - 30, 2017.
  • The East Cooper Episcopal Church has a new home. They now hold Sunday services at 10:00 A.M. at the J. Henry Stuhr Mount Pleasant Chapel at 1494 Mathis Ferry Road, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464
  • The Gatherers attended the dedication ceremony at the Penn Center in Beaufort, SC and were excited to speak with The Honorable James Clyburn after his presentation.
    Members pictured here left to right: Wallace and Joan Bonaparte, Congressman Clyburn, Hannah Heyward and Masha Britten.

  • The Gatherers viewed the movie 13th and are holding ongoing discussions.











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'Gather Around the Table'

Friday, June 17, marks one year since the night a gunman took the lives of nine people at Emanuel AME Church. As we remember this anniversary, may we pause in prayer for the people who died, for those who still mourn, and for every life that was irrevocably affected by the tragedy of that night in 2015.

The following article represents one way in which people in The Episcopal Church in South Carolina are responding after Emanuel to seek a path toward understanding and reconciliation. In the days ahead, we encourage others to share their stories, too.

O God, it is your will to hold both heaven and earth in a single peace. Let the design of your great love shine on the pains of our woundedness, confusion and great sorrow, and continue to bring peace to our community, peace to your Church, peace among peoples, and peace in our homes. And may the balm of your reconciling love lived out among us continue to soothe our suffering hearts. All this we pray in name of our wounded and risen Savior, God with us, Jesus Christ. Amen.

​It’s a June evening in Charleston, and the back door of the church is unlocked. People come in at their own pace, embracing, smiling, setting down plates of cookies on the big table in the parish hall.

No one speaks of it yet, but on everyone’s mind is a June evening in Charleston almost one year earlier, when nine people were shot dead just a mile away at Emanuel AME Church, in an African American congregation that opened its doors and invited the killer into their weekly Bible study.

The horror of June 17, 2015 and the days that followed gave way to deep grief, and deep questions. How could this have happened? What could I be doing to change that? How can we find bridges across the barriers of race?

Every Tuesday night, a small group from two local Episcopal churches, East Cooper and Calvary, have been meeting to see if they can find some answers. The name they have given themselves reflects the simple agenda for the group: “Gatherers Around the Table.”

After the massacre at Mother Emanuel, The Episcopal Church in South Carolina accelerated its plan to offer anti-racism training for the diocese – training that is required by Episcopal Church canons, but was never offered until a rift in 2012 brought new leadership. Bishop Charles G. vonRosenberg, who took office in January 2013, immediately put anti-racism training on his  short-list of needs for the reorganizing diocese, and the first one was on the calendar when the Emanuel tragedy struck.

In September 2015, Calvary hosted one of four “Traces of the Trade” conferences offered around the diocese. Each event encouraged people to open their minds and hearts to conversations about the legacy of slavery and racism.

Judith Ewing, an Episcopal deacon who serves at East Cooper, was at the Calvary program. “I realized how ignorant I was,” she said. “I realized the importance of relationships, of just getting to know each other. I just knew we needed to gather at the table.”
 
She quickly sought out the Rev. Michael Burton, a supply priest at Calvary, about setting up an initial gathering. The first one happened in October: Six people from each congregation, who committed to meeting every Tuesday for a trial run of six weeks.

Like Emanuel, Calvary has deep roots in Charleston’s history, founded in 1847 for “religious instruction” of enslaved African Americans. For years, it housed the only preschool and kindergarten for African American children on the Charleston peninsula, and many leaders passed through its doors. The first black jurist to serve on an appellate court in the United States, Jonathan Jasper Wright, was buried in its churchyard in 1885.

By comparison, the East Cooper Episcopal Church is in its infancy. Approved as a new mission congregation at Diocesan Convention in 2014, it serves the predominantly white suburbs across the Cooper River from Charleston. It was formed by Episcopalians who were left without a place to worship when churches in that area went with the breakaway group that left The Episcopal Church in 2012.
 
With widely different backgrounds, the two groups shared one common characteristic: Curiosity, and a desire to learn about each other.
 
Their first meeting was planned as a simple Bible study, “because that would be sweet and safe and nobody would say anything that will upset anybody,” Ewing said. “But I said, ‘Maybe we need to say things that upset people.’”
 
Artist and educator Marlene O’Bryant-Seabrook was there, and had the same reaction. Ewing recalls her saying: “I’ve been to many Bible studies, and nobody ever mentions the elephant in the middle of the room. Why can’t we mention the elephant in the room?”
 
Eight months later, the elephant is still loose. Trayvon Martin and Freddie Gray. The challenges of growing up in a mixed-race family. Assumptions about intelligence. Co-workers who act friendly, but never get close. The Spoleto production of “Porgy and Bess.” Ethnic foods they like and dislike. It’s all on the table when they gather.
 
“We’ve never put aside anything, or say ‘We mustn’t talk about that.’ We talk about everything,” Deacon Ewing says.
 

Along the way, others have joined. One member recently moved from New York after years in churches that were active in social justice issues, looking for a community in Charleston where that could keep happening. Another regular Gatherer is a social worker from another church who came with an East Cooper friend.  “I thought I knew almost everything about black culture, especially in Charleston,” she says, laughing. “But I don’t.”

Dr. O’Bryant-Seabrook, a Calvary member in her 80s, has become the group’s matriarch and historian. On the recent Tuesday night in June, she gave them all an assignment: Come up with a personal statement about why they came to be “Gatherers Around the Table,” and then create a small journal-quilt to illustrate it. A few skeptical looks were exchanged around the table, but the group quickly warmed up to the task of explaining why they come to the meetings week after week.
 
The Tuesday before the Emanuel anniversary, they were putting the final touches on their letter-sized pieces of fabric art filled with color, symbols, and words like Curious, Sharing, Understanding, Love, and Hope. Beside an image of Emanuel, one proclaims: “Hate Will Not Win!”
 
As a child growing up in Charleston, Dr. O’Bryant-Seabrook says, “I could not go three blocks without passing a church. I remember asking my mother, ‘I would like to know what they’re praying for.’ With all the inequities and oppression, I wondered, were they praying for something that black churches were not praying for?”
 
Decades later, those questions persist. “I wanted to be a part of this group because for a long, long, long, long time, I wanted to be comfortable in a group of caucasians and blacks where we can actually, openly, honestly and safely discuss what happens, and why it happens,” she says.

As the members of the group went around the room, the words “safe place” came up again and again.
 
“When we started, we said we weren’t’ going to judge, or say “You shouldn’t be saying that,” Deacon Ewing says. “We were going to accept each one in our knowledge and our ignorance, and love each other anyway.”
 
As the gathering wraps up, the group continues to share their ideas as they pass the plates of cookies around the table. “When you eat with somebody, it changes the whole dynamic,” one woman says. “It gives me a lot of hope.”
 
In the words of Anne Nietert’s journal quilt: “Anger exploded into the Palmetto night, but, in the shadows, a new day is dawning as we Gather at the Table to learn, to listen, and to love.” 
 
Holly Behre, Director of Communications
The Episcopal Church in South Carolina

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