What's Happening at Calvary

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/first-black-episcopal-church-leader-will-continue-his-fathers-teachings/2015/10/14/bede82e2-72b2-11e5-8d93-0af317ed58c9_story.html http://www.episcopalchurchsc.org/lent-2016.html https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/episcopal-church-installs-its-first-african-american-bishop/2015/11/01/d9b7c44c-80d2-11e5-9afb-0c971f713d0c_story.htmlhttps://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/episcopal-church-installs-its-first-african-american-bishop/2015/11/01/d9b7c44c-80d2-11e5-9afb-0c971f713d0c_story.html

READINGS AND GOSPELS for Palm Sunday, March 25, 2018

posted Dec 10, 2016, 12:55 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Mar 19, 2018, 6:25 PM ]





Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday

Occasion: 
The Liturgy of the Palms
Sunday, March 25, 2018
Year (cycle): B


Psalm: 
Psalm 118:1-2, 19-29

1 Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; *
       his mercy endures for ever.
2 Let Israel now proclaim, *
      "His mercy endures for ever."
19 Open for me the gates of righteousness; *
       I will enter them;
       I will offer thanks to the Lord.
20 "This is the gate of the Lord; *
       he who is righteous may enter."
21 I will give thanks to you, for you answered me *
       and have become my salvation.
22 The same stone which the builders rejected *
       has become the chief cornerstone.
23 This is the Lord's doing, *
       and it is marvelous in our eyes.
24 On this day the Lord has acted; *
       we will rejoice and be glad in it.
25 Hosannah, Lord, hosannah! *
       Lord, send us now success.
26 Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord; *
       we bless you from the house of the Lord.
27 God is the Lord; he has shined upon us; *
       form a procession with branches up to the horns of the altar.
28 "You are my God, and I will thank you; *
       you are my God, and I will exalt you."
29 Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good; *
       his mercy endures for ever.

Gospel: 
Mark 11:1-11 or John 12:12-16

Mark 11:1-11

1When they were approaching Jerusalem, at Bethphage and Bethany, near the Mount of Olives, he sent two of his disciples 2and said to them, ‘Go into the village ahead of you, and immediately as you enter it, you will find tied there a colt that has never been ridden; untie it and bring it. 3If anyone says to you, “Why are you doing this?” just say this, “The Lord needs it and will send it back here immediately.” ’ 4They went away and found a colt tied near a door, outside in the street. As they were untying it, 5some of the bystanders said to them, ‘What are you doing, untying the colt?’ 6They told them what Jesus had said; and they allowed them to take it. 7Then they brought the colt to Jesus and threw their cloaks on it; and he sat on it. 8Many people spread their cloaks on the road, and others spread leafy branches that they had cut in the fields. 9Then those who went ahead and those who followed were shouting,
‘Hosanna!
   Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord! 
10   Blessed is the coming kingdom of our ancestor David!
Hosanna in the highest heaven!’

11 Then he entered Jerusalem and went into the temple; and when he had looked around at everything, as it was already late, he went out to Bethany with the twelve.

John 12:12-16

12The next day the great crowd that had come to the festival heard that Jesus was coming to Jerusalem. 13So they took branches of palm trees and went out to meet him, shouting,
‘Hosanna!
Blessed is the one who comes in the name of the Lord—
   the King of Israel!’ 
14Jesus found a young donkey and sat on it; as it is written: 
15 ‘Do not be afraid, daughter of Zion.
Look, your king is coming,
   sitting on a donkey’s colt!’ 
16His disciples did not understand these things at first; but when Jesus was glorified, then they remembered that these things had been written of him and had been done to him.


Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday

Occasion: 
The Liturgy of the Word
Sunday, March 25, 2018
Year (cycle): B


The Collect: 

Almighty and everliving God, in your tender love for the human race you sent your Son our Savior Jesus Christ to take upon him our nature, and to suffer death upon the cross, giving us the example of his great humility: Mercifully grant that we may walk in the way of his suffering, and also share in his resurrection; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

Old Testament: 
Isaiah 50:4-9a

4 The Lord God has given me
   the tongue of a teacher,
that I may know how to sustain
   the weary with a word.
Morning by morning he wakens—
   wakens my ear
   to listen as those who are taught. 
5 The Lord God has opened my ear,
   and I was not rebellious,
   I did not turn backwards. 
6 I gave my back to those who struck me,
   and my cheeks to those who pulled out the beard;
I did not hide my face
   from insult and spitting. 

7 The Lord God helps me;
   therefore I have not been disgraced;
therefore I have set my face like flint,
   and I know that I shall not be put to shame; 
8   he who vindicates me is near.
Who will contend with me?
   Let us stand up together.
Who are my adversaries?
   Let them confront me. 
9 It is the Lord God who helps me;
   who will declare me guilty?
All of them will wear out like a garment;
   the moth will eat them up. 

Psalm: 
Psalm 31:9-16

9 Have mercy on me, O Lord, for I am in trouble; *
       my eye is consumed with sorrow,
       and also my throat and my belly.
10 For my life is wasted with grief,
   and my years with sighing; *
       my strength fails me because of affliction,
       and my bones are consumed.
11 I have become a reproach to all my enemies and even to my neighbors,
                                   a dismay to those of my acquaintance; *
       when they see me in the street they avoid me.
12 I am forgotten like a dead man, out of mind; *
       I am as useless as a broken pot.
13 For I have heard the whispering of the crowd;
   fear is all around; *
       they put their heads together against me;
       they plot to take my life.
14 But as for me, I have trusted in you, O Lord. *
        I have said, "You are my God.
15 My times are in your hand; *
       rescue me from the hand of my enemies,
       and from those who persecute me.
16 Make your face to shine upon your servant, *
       and in your loving-kindness save me."

Epistle: 
Philippians 2:5-11

5Let the same mind be in you that was in Christ Jesus, 
6 who, though he was in the form of God,
   did not regard equality with God
   as something to be exploited, 
7 but emptied himself,
   taking the form of a slave,
   being born in human likeness.
And being found in human form, 
8   he humbled himself
   and became obedient to the point of death—
   even death on a cross. 

9 Therefore God also highly exalted him
   and gave him the name
   that is above every name, 
10 so that at the name of Jesus
   every knee should bend,
   in heaven and on earth and under the earth, 
11 and every tongue should confess
   that Jesus Christ is Lord,
   to the glory of God the Father. 

Gospel: 
Mark 14:1-15:47 or Mark 15:1-39, 40-47

1It was two days before the Passover and the festival of Unleavened Bread. The chief priests and the scribes were looking for a way to arrest Jesus by stealth and kill him; 2for they said, ‘Not during the festival, or there may be a riot among the people.’ 3 While he was at Bethany in the house of Simon the leper, as he sat at the table, a woman came with an alabaster jar of very costly ointment of nard, and she broke open the jar and poured the ointment on his head. 4But some were there who said to one another in anger, ‘Why was the ointment wasted in this way? 5For this ointment could have been sold for more than three hundred denarii, and the money given to the poor.’ And they scolded her. 6But Jesus said, ‘Let her alone; why do you trouble her? She has performed a good service for me. 7For you always have the poor with you, and you can show kindness to them whenever you wish; but you will not always have me. 8She has done what she could; she has anointed my body beforehand for its burial. 9Truly I tell you, wherever the good news is proclaimed in the whole world, what she has done will be told in remembrance of her.’ 10 Then Judas Iscariot, who was one of the twelve, went to the chief priests in order to betray him to them. 11When they heard it, they were greatly pleased, and promised to give him money. So he began to look for an opportunity to betray him. 

12 On the first day of Unleavened Bread, when the Passover lamb is sacrificed, his disciples said to him, ‘Where do you want us to go and make the preparations for you to eat the Passover?’ 13So he sent two of his disciples, saying to them, ‘Go into the city, and a man carrying a jar of water will meet you; follow him, 14and wherever he enters, say to the owner of the house, “The Teacher asks, Where is my guest room where I may eat the Passover with my disciples?” 15He will show you a large room upstairs, furnished and ready. Make preparations for us there.’ 16So the disciples set out and went to the city, and found everything as he had told them; and they prepared the Passover meal. 17 When it was evening, he came with the twelve. 18And when they had taken their places and were eating, Jesus said, ‘Truly I tell you, one of you will betray me, one who is eating with me.’ 19They began to be distressed and to say to him one after another, ‘Surely, not I?’ 20He said to them, ‘It is one of the twelve, one who is dipping bread into the bowl with me. 21For the Son of Man goes as it is written of him, but woe to that one by whom the Son of Man is betrayed! It would have been better for that one not to have been born.’

22 While they were eating, he took a loaf of bread, and after blessing it he broke it, gave it to them, and said, ‘Take; this is my body.’ 23Then he took a cup, and after giving thanks he gave it to them, and all of them drank from it. 24He said to them, ‘This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many. 25Truly I tell you, I will never again drink of the fruit of the vine until that day when I drink it new in the kingdom of God.’ 26 When they had sung the hymn, they went out to the Mount of Olives.27And Jesus said to them, ‘You will all become deserters; for it is written,

“I will strike the shepherd,
   and the sheep will be scattered.” 
28But after I am raised up, I will go before you to Galilee.’ 29Peter said to him, ‘Even though all become deserters, I will not.’ 30Jesus said to him, ‘Truly I tell you, this day, this very night, before the cock crows twice, you will deny me three times.’ 31But he said vehemently, ‘Even though I must die with you, I will not deny you.’ And all of them said the same. 32 They went to a place called Gethsemane; and he said to his disciples, ‘Sit here while I pray.’ 33He took with him Peter and James and John, and began to be distressed and agitated. 34And he said to them, ‘I am deeply grieved, even to death; remain here, and keep awake.’ 35And going a little farther, he threw himself on the ground and prayed that, if it were possible, the hour might pass from him. 36He said, ‘Abba, Father, for you all things are possible; remove this cup from me; yet, not what I want, but what you want.’ 37He came and found them sleeping; and he said to Peter, ‘Simon, are you asleep? Could you not keep awake one hour? 38Keep awake and pray that you may not come into the time of trial; the spirit indeed is willing, but the flesh is weak.’ 39And again he went away and prayed, saying the same words. 40And once more he came and found them sleeping, for their eyes were very heavy; and they did not know what to say to him. 41He came a third time and said to them, ‘Are you still sleeping and taking your rest? Enough! The hour has come; the Son of Man is betrayed into the hands of sinners. 42Get up, let us be going. See, my betrayer is at hand.’

43 Immediately, while he was still speaking, Judas, one of the twelve, arrived; and with him there was a crowd with swords and clubs, from the chief priests, the scribes, and the elders. 44Now the betrayer had given them a sign, saying, ‘The one I will kiss is the man; arrest him and lead him away under guard.’ 45So when he came, he went up to him at once and said, ‘Rabbi!’ and kissed him. 46Then they laid hands on him and arrested him. 47But one of those who stood near drew his sword and struck the slave of the high priest, cutting off his ear. 48Then Jesus said to them, ‘Have you come out with swords and clubs to arrest me as though I were a bandit? 49Day after day I was with you in the temple teaching, and you did not arrest me. But let the scriptures be fulfilled.’50All of them deserted him and fled. 51 A certain young man was following him, wearing nothing but a linen cloth. They caught hold of him, 52but he left the linen cloth and ran off naked.

53 They took Jesus to the high priest; and all the chief priests, the elders, and the scribes were assembled. 54Peter had followed him at a distance, right into the courtyard of the high priest; and he was sitting with the guards, warming himself at the fire. 55Now the chief priests and the whole council were looking for testimony against Jesus to put him to death; but they found none. 56For many gave false testimony against him, and their testimony did not agree. 57Some stood up and gave false testimony against him, saying, 58‘We heard him say, “I will destroy this temple that is made with hands, and in three days I will build another, not made with hands.” ’ 59But even on this point their testimony did not agree. 60Then the high priest stood up before them and asked Jesus, ‘Have you no answer? What is it that they testify against you?’ 61But he was silent and did not answer. Again the high priest asked him, ‘Are you the Messiah, the Son of the Blessed One?’ 62Jesus said, ‘I am; and “you will see the Son of Man seated at the right hand of the Power”, and “coming with the clouds of heaven.” ’  63Then the high priest tore his clothes and said, ‘Why do we still need witnesses? 64You have heard his blasphemy! What is your decision?’ All of them condemned him as deserving death. 65Some began to spit on him, to blindfold him, and to strike him, saying to him, ‘Prophesy!’ The guards also took him over and beat him.

66 While Peter was below in the courtyard, one of the servant-girls of the high priest came by. 67When she saw Peter warming himself, she stared at him and said, ‘You also were with Jesus, the man from Nazareth.’68But he denied it, saying, ‘I do not know or understand what you are talking about.’ And he went out into the forecourt.* Then the cock crowed.* 69And the servant-girl, on seeing him, began again to say to the bystanders, ‘This man is one of them.’ 70But again he denied it. Then after a little while the bystanders again said to Peter, ‘Certainly you are one of them; for you are a Galilean.’ 71But he began to curse, and he swore an oath, ‘I do not know this man you are talking about.’ 72At that moment the cock crowed for the second time. Then Peter remembered that Jesus had said to him, ‘Before the cock crows twice, you will deny me three times.’ And he broke down and wept.

Mark 15:1-39, 40-47

15 As soon as it was morning, the chief priests held a consultation with the elders and scribes and the whole council. They bound Jesus, led him away, and handed him over to Pilate. 2Pilate asked him, ‘Are you the King of the Jews?’ He answered him, ‘You say so.’ 3Then the chief priests accused him of many things. 4Pilate asked him again, ‘Have you no answer? See how many charges they bring against you.’ 5But Jesus made no further reply, so that Pilate was amazed. 6 Now at the festival he used to release a prisoner for them, anyone for whom they asked. 7Now a man called Barabbas was in prison with the rebels who had committed murder during the insurrection. 8So the crowd came and began to ask Pilate to do for them according to his custom.9Then he answered them, ‘Do you want me to release for you the King of the Jews?’ 10For he realized that it was out of jealousy that the chief priests had handed him over. 11But the chief priests stirred up the crowd to have him release Barabbas for them instead. 12Pilate spoke to them again, ‘Then what do you wish me to do with the man you call the King of the Jews?’ 13They shouted back, ‘Crucify him!’ 14Pilate asked them, ‘Why, what evil has he done?’ But they shouted all the more, ‘Crucify him!’ 15So Pilate, wishing to satisfy the crowd, released Barabbas for them; and after flogging Jesus, he handed him over to be crucified.

16 Then the soldiers led him into the courtyard of the palace (that is, the governor’s headquarters); and they called together the whole cohort.17And they clothed him in a purple cloak; and after twisting some thorns into a crown, they put it on him. 18And they began saluting him, ‘Hail, King of the Jews!’ 19They struck his head with a reed, spat upon him, and knelt down in homage to him. 20After mocking him, they stripped him of the purple cloak and put his own clothes on him. Then they led him out to crucify him. 21 They compelled a passer-by, who was coming in from the country, to carry his cross; it was Simon of Cyrene, the father of Alexander and Rufus. 22Then they brought Jesus to the place called Golgotha (which means the place of a skull). 23And they offered him wine mixed with myrrh; but he did not take it. 24And they crucified him, and divided his clothes among them, casting lots to decide what each should take.

25 It was nine o’clock in the morning when they crucified him. 26The inscription of the charge against him read, ‘The King of the Jews.’ 27And with him they crucified two bandits, one on his right and one on his left.*29Those who passed by derided him, shaking their heads and saying, ‘Aha! You who would destroy the temple and build it in three days, 30save yourself, and come down from the cross!’ 31In the same way the chief priests, along with the scribes, were also mocking him among themselves and saying, ‘He saved others; he cannot save himself. 32Let the Messiah, the King of Israel, come down from the cross now, so that we may see and believe.’ Those who were crucified with him also taunted him.

33 When it was noon, darkness came over the whole land until three in the afternoon. 34At three o’clock Jesus cried out with a loud voice, ‘Eloi, Eloi, lema sabachthani?’ which means, ‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?’ 35When some of the bystanders heard it, they said, ‘Listen, he is calling for Elijah.’ 36And someone ran, filled a sponge with sour wine, put it on a stick, and gave it to him to drink, saying, ‘Wait, let us see whether Elijah will come to take him down.’ 37Then Jesus gave a loud cry and breathed his last. 38And the curtain of the temple was torn in two, from top to bottom. 39Now when the centurion, who stood facing him, saw that in this way he breathed his last, he said, ‘Truly this man was God’s Son!’*

40 There were also women looking on from a distance; among them were Mary Magdalene, and Mary the mother of James the younger and of Joses, and Salome. 41These used to follow him and provided for him when he was in Galilee; and there were many other women who had come up with him to Jerusalem. 42 When evening had come, and since it was the day of Preparation, that is, the day before the sabbath, 43Joseph of Arimathea, a respected member of the council, who was also himself waiting expectantly for the kingdom of God, went boldly to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus.44Then Pilate wondered if he were already dead; and summoning the centurion, he asked him whether he had been dead for some time.45When he learned from the centurion that he was dead, he granted the body to Joseph. 46Then Joseph bought a linen cloth, and taking down the body, wrapped it in the linen cloth, and laid it in a tomb that had been hewn out of the rock. He then rolled a stone against the door of the tomb. 47Mary Magdalene and Mary the mother of Jesus saw where the body was laid.

The Old Testament, New Testament and Gospels readings are from the New Revised Standard Version Bible: Anglicized Edition, copyright 1989, 1995, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

The Collects, Psalms and Canticles are from the Book of Common Prayer, 1979.

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Daily Readings ...

posted Jul 4, 2016, 6:42 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Mar 19, 2018, 6:30 PM ]



The daily readings expand the range of biblical reading in worship and personal devotion.  These readings complement the Sunday and festival readings: Monday through Wednesday readings help the reader reflect on and digest what they heard in worship on Sunday; Thursday through Saturday readings help prepare the reader for the Sunday ahead.

Source:  http://lectionary.library.vanderbilt.edu/daily.php?year=C#id264


Note: For the readings after Pentecost: the first reading pairs with the semi-continuous strand of texts; the second, with the complementary.





Sunday, March 25, 2018: Liturgy of the Palms
Reflection:

Preparation:




Sunday, March 18, 2018
: Fifth Sunday in Lent




Reproduced from Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings copyright © 2005 Consultation on Common Texts admin. Augsburg Fortress. Used by permission. A complete edition of the Daily Readings is available though Augsburg Fortress.



Calvary News and Announcements ...

posted Jun 15, 2016, 4:07 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Mar 22, 2018, 12:06 AM ]









**  CANCELLED  **  ECW  OYSTER ROAST on April 7 is CANCELLED
The Episcopal Church Women annual Oyster Roast on April 7, 2018 is CANCELLED. 

Renewal of Ordination Vows held at Calvary Church on February 20, 2018: 
The Bishop's Sermon

What role does memory play in the life of faith? Preaching at the annual renewal of ordination vows for clergy of our diocese, Bishop Skip Adams said that one of the central responsibilities of being a deacon, priest, or bishop "is to help the people of God to remember." 
Watch the video of the sermon and find the text of his sermon here.
Priests and deacons of our diocese gathered with Bishop Skip Adams at Calvary Episcopal Church in Charleston today to celebrate Holy Eucharist,
renew their ordination vows, and bless the oils used for baptism and healing.
This annual service is held during Lent, and we ask your prayers for all our clergy: Find a list at our website:


EpisComm18 is coming to Kanuga April 17-20

The national Episcopal Communicators Conference will be April 17-20, 2018 at Kanuga Episcopal Conference Center near Hendersonville NC. Registration is now open, and I am planning to attend this as well.  

Please consider attending (or sending someone to) this important national conference - both for the excellent workshops and speakers, and for the opportunity to meet people from all over The Episcopal Church who are doing this kind of work, too. You will come home with fresh inspiration, exciting ideas, and new friendships. 

Membership in Episcopal Communicators is $75 and well worth it (Membership is by calendar year, so wait til January to join). Members are eligible to apply for conference scholarships, including a special one for first-time attendees. Details are at http://episcopalcommunicators.org.


~~~~~~~~






Our own Mr. Lonnie Hamilton III has been awarded the prestigious DEAN'S CROSS award by the Virginia Theological Seminary.

Established in November 2008, the Dean’s Cross award recognizes outstanding leaders who embody their baptismal vows to “strive for justice and peace among all people and respect the dignity of every human being.”  Selected annually by the Seminary Dean in consultation with the Chair of the Board, the Honorees receive a handmade silver cross, modeled after the Seminary Chapel cross, and a certificate.  

“Our work here at Virginia Seminary is formation,” said the Very Rev. Ian Markham, dean and president of Virginia Seminary, “and this award celebrates the well-formed life, which involves living out the values of the baptismal covenant and making a difference in society.”



                       
   Past Recipients of the award include:

   December 7, 2014
  • Ms. Madeleine Albright from Washington, D.C.
    Former (and the first female) Secretary of State of the United States of America

   December 6, 2015
  • Mrs. Barbara Bush from Houston, TX.
    Former First Lady of the United States of America




  • ON JULY 23, 2017, CALVARY CHURCH  WELCOMED MEMBERS OF ST. MARY'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH FROM WAYNE, PENNSYLVANIA
Fr. Joseph Smith, Rector, and Members of St. Mary's Episcopal Church in Wayne, PA  were in the Charleston area on July 23 for a mission trip with a group called Home Works. They worked primarily on John's Island, bringing around 22 youth and adults. Calvary extended our warmest welcome to these travelers to worship with us that Sunday. 

.

 




This was a return visit for the Youth Group and group leaders of St. Mary's to do their mission work on John's Island. 
Follow the link below to see pictures from last  year's visit.









ECW  FISH FRY on February 23    
The Episcopal Church Women (ECW) will host a  FISH FRY on Friday, February 23 from 4 - 6 pm.
Tickets are $10

Location: Calvary Church Parish Hall, 104 Line Street, Charleston SC 29403



ECW  OYSTER ROAST on April 7
The Episcopal Church Women will host their annual Oyster Roast on April 7, 2018 from 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm. 
Tickets are $20 adults and $10 children ages 6-12 years.
Location: Calvary Church Parish Hall, 104 Line Street, Charleston SC 29403



EpisComm18 is coming to Kanuga April 17-20

The national Episcopal Communicators Conference will be April 17-20, 2018 at Kanuga Episcopal Conference Center near Hendersonville NC. Registration is now open, and I am planning to attend this as well.  

Please consider attending (or sending someone to) this important national conference - both for the excellent workshops and speakers, and for the opportunity to meet people from all over The Episcopal Church who are doing this kind of work, too. You will come home with fresh inspiration, exciting ideas, and new friendships. 



~~~~~~~~






Our own Mr. Lonnie Hamilton III has been awarded the prestigious DEAN'S CROSS award by the Virginia Theological Seminary.

Established in November 2008, the Dean’s Cross award recognizes outstanding leaders who embody their baptismal vows to “strive for justice and peace among all people and respect the dignity of every human being.”  Selected annually by the Seminary Dean in consultation with the Chair of the Board, the Honorees receive a handmade silver cross, modeled after the Seminary Chapel cross, and a certificate.  

“Our work here at Virginia Seminary is formation,” said the Very Rev. Ian Markham, dean and president of Virginia Seminary, “and this award celebrates the well-formed life, which involves living out the values of the baptismal covenant and making a difference in society.”



                       
   Past Recipients of the award include:

   December 7, 2014
  • Ms. Madeleine Albright from Washington, D.C.
    Former (and the first female) Secretary of State of the United States of America

   December 6, 2015
  • Mrs. Barbara Bush from Houston, TX.
    Former First Lady of the United States of America




  • ON JULY 23, 2017, CALVARY CHURCH  WELCOMED MEMBERS OF ST. MARY'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH FROM WAYNE, PENNSYLVANIA
Fr. Joseph Smith, Rector, and Members of St. Mary's Episcopal Church in Wayne, PA  were in the Charleston area on July 23 for a mission trip with a group called Home Works. They worked primarily on John's Island, bringing around 22 youth and adults. Calvary extended our warmest welcome to these travelers to worship with us that Sunday. 

.

 




This was a return visit for the Youth Group and group leaders of St. Mary's to do their mission work on John's Island. 
Follow the link below to see pictures from last  year's visit.


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AROUND THE DIOCESE - Events, Resources, Services

posted Jun 15, 2016, 2:30 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Mar 19, 2018, 6:47 PM ]


Picture

An invitation to a holy Lent

Visit the Diocesan 2018 Lent Page for...
- Lenten Quiet Days
- Special studies and speakers
- Resources for devotion and study
- And much more!


The Episcopal Church in South Carolina



Special Lenten Programs


Seek, Knock, Ask – A Lenten Journey of Discovery
Wednesdays, February 21-March 21, 6:00 p.m.
For the Southern Deanery, including:
Christ Church, Denmark

St. Mark's, Port Royal
​All Saints, Hilton Head Island
All Saints, Hampton
(joined by Holy Communion Allendale & Heavenly Rest, Estill)
The Episcopal Church in Okatie
This five-part Wednesday evening series will explore the foundations of our faith. If you're considering reception or confirmation into the Episcopal Church or just want to refresh your faith, these classes are for you. They'll be taught round-robin style by clergy from the Southern Deanery with a different presenter each week. 
Topics include:
  • Who is God to Me? The Creeds and beyond. . .
  • Who am I to God? Child, companion, caretaker. . .
  • What is the Church to me? Eat, learn, pray, love. . . 
  • What am I supposed to do? Mission, ministry and me. . . 
  • Why is the Episcopal Church for me? Our story, structures and other distinctives. . .
Each week begins with a simple supper at 6:00 p.m.
Find a complete schedule of classes and locations here.

Downtown Charleston: Lenten Preaching Series
Wednesdays, 12:00 p.m. February 21-March 21

St. Stephen's, Charleston and its rector, the Rev. Adam Shoemaker, will be part of the Ansonborough neighborhood Lenten Preaching Series on Wednesdays at 12:00 p.m. with the clergy of five other downtown Charleston churches. Each church will host a 30-minute service with a guest preacher. A simple lunch will be served after the service. All are welcome.
February 21: Centenary United Methodist, 60 Wentworth St.; the Rev. Willie J. Hill Jr.
February 28: St. John's Reformed Episcopal Church, 91 Anson St.; the Rev. Greta Bridges
March 7: St. Johannes Lutheran Church, 48 Hasell St.; the Rev. Lorenzo Moses
March 14: Trinity United Methodist Church, 273 Meeting St.; the Rev. Adam J. Shoemaker
March 21: St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, 67 Anson St.; the Rev. Alvin Shrum

Technicolor Jesus: What Pop Culture Tells Us About Christianity
Wednesdays at 12:00 p.m., February 21-March 21 
The Episcopal Church on Edisto offers this popular lunchtime series this Lent. Beginning with Noonday Prayers, a presentation and discussion of religion and pop culture will survey the landscape of Christian themes appearing in movies. Aided by visits from Cn. John Zahl and Cn. Caleb Lee from Grace Church Cathedral, Edisto's Priest in Charge, the Reverend Paul Gilbert, will help lead the discussion using film clips from various sources. A light lunch follows the discussion. All are welcome.

​Soup & Sandwich Bible Study
Good Shepherd, Summerville
Wednesdays, 6:00-7:30 p.m. February 21-March 21

Practice, not Perfect: A Lenten Primer
Wednesdays at 6:45 p.m. February 14-21

Grace Church Cathedral will offer a weekly Lenten program on Wednesday evenings, following the Community Supper at 6:00 p.m. The first speaker will be the Right Reverend Robert Gillies, retired Bishop of Aberdeen and Orkney in the Scottish Episcopal Church. His topic February 14 will be Approaching the Cross.
February 21: Approaching the Season, with the Very Rev. J. Michael A. Wright
February 28: Approaching the Self, with the Rev. Cn. John Zahl
March 7: Approaching the Scriptures, with the Rev. Cn. Caleb J. Lee
Marchh 14: Approaching the Sacred, with the Ven. Calhoun Walpole
March 21: Approaching the Future, with Bishop Skip Adams.

Noonday Eucharists
Grace Church Cathedral  will celebrate Holy Eucharist daily during Lent, adding to its regular schedule a Lenten series of services at 12:00 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday & Saturday from February 15-March 24. These will be in addition to the regular Wednesday and Sunday services at Grace.

We Are All One in Mission
Wednesdays, February 21-March 21
12:15 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. 
Church of the Messiah, Myrtle Beach 
and St. Philip Lutheran Church will jointly offer Wednesday teachings and reflections on the "Five Marks of Mission." Each program is offered twice; the evening program will include a simple soup-and-salad supper at 6:00 p.m.
February 21: The Rev. Jason Lee, St. Philip Lutheran Church, "To proclaim the good news of the Kingdom  "      
February 28: The Rev. Dick Albert, St. Philip Lutheran Church, "To teach, baptise and nurture new believers"
March 7: The Rev. Caroline Goodkind, Priest Associate of the Church of the Messiah, "To respond to human need by loving service"
March 14: The Rev. Beth Neubauer, St. Philip Lutheran Church, "To seek to transform unjust structures in society"
March 21: The Rev. George Welles, Priest Associate of the Church of the Messiah, "To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation, and sustain and renew the life of the earth"

Weekly Supper & Evening Prayer
Wednesdays, February 21-March 21
6:00 p.m.

St. Catherine's, Florence will serve a simple meal each Wednesday in Lent, followed by Evening Prayer at 7:00 p.m.

End of Life Issues
Sundays, February 17-March 17
10:00-10:45 a.m.

St. Stephen's, Charleston
This Lenten series will offer a variety of teachings on end of life issues such as how to care for the dying, how to talk to children about death, as well as how to reflect upon our own mortality.
February 18: The Rev. Adam Shoemaker

February 25: The Rev. Courtney Davis-Shoemaker
March 4: The Rev. Tom Wilson and Mr. Robin Bugbee
March 11: Mrs. Erin Bailey Esq.
March 18: The Rev. Adam Shoemaker

Lenten Supper & Speakers
Thursdays, March 1 and March 15, 6:00-8:00 p.m.
St. Thomas, North Charleston

St. Thomas will offer two Lenten evening programs, beginning with supper at 6:00 p.m. followed by a speaker at 7:00 p.m. Details will be posted soon


Music in Lent


Choral Evensongs
Grace Church Cathedral will offer Choral Evensong each Sunday in Lent at 4:00 p.m. beginning February 18 and continuing through Palm Sunday, March 25Choirs will include Grace's St. Gregory, St. Nicholas, and Parish choirs as well as the local ensemble The King's Counterpoint. All are welcome.




UPCOMING CONFERENCES AND EVENTS:


April 17-20, 2018 - EpisComm18 is coming to Kanuga 
The national Episcopal Communicators Conference will be April 17-20, 2018 at Kanuga Episcopal Conference Center near Hendersonville NC. Registration is now open.

Membership in Episcopal Communicators is $75 and well worth it (Membership is by calendar year, so wait til January to join). Members are eligible to apply for conference scholarships, including a special one for first-time attendees. Details are at http://episcopalcommunicators.org.



#SMS2018 will be September 30, 2018
Social Media Sunday is the day set aside for Christians everywhere to use digital devices intentionally to share their life of faith with the world. It's always held on the last Sunday in September.

Here are some resources for those who plan to participate.

2017 Social Media Sunday Information Sheet for congregations in our diocese

Bulletin Inserts on Social Media Sunday from The Episcopal Church (these are from 2016 but give a great description of the event)

Join the Facebook Group for Social Media Sunday!

NEWS BLOG for the Episcopal Church in South Carolina
http://www.episcopalchurchsc.org/news-blog


News from the Episcopal Church
https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/



Here are some of the resources offered around The Episcopal Church for individuals and congregations to use in keeping a holy Lent.


Resources for Lent 2018
Ecumenical Lent Devotions 
Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry joined the leaders of the Anglican Church of Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America in preparing Lent Devotionsfor the upcoming liturgical season.
Named Set Free By Truth, the Lent Devotions begin with Ash Wednesday on February 14 and continue through Easter Sunday, April 1. Each segment of Set Free By Truthpresents Scripture citations, a reflection, and a prayer.
Set Free By Truth is available for free downloading here.

"Ashes to Easter"
Grace Church Cathedral will be sharing daily inspirational quotations and images to meditate on each day during Lent. You can sign up to receive them by email, or find them posted daily on Facebook and Instagram. 

Here are some additional resources offered around The Episcopal Church for individuals and congregations to use in keeping a holy Lent.

The Good Book Club: 
Churchwide Bible reading program

(goodbookclub.org)Forward Movement has announced the Good Book Club, an invitation to all Episcopalians to join in reading the Gospel of Luke and the Book of Acts during Lent-Easter 2018. Episcopalians will start reading Luke on Sunday, February 11 and read a section of Luke’s Gospel every day through the season of Lent. The entire season of Easter will be devoted to daily readings from the Book of Acts. 

Luke the Liberator
ChurchNext offers Luke the Liberator, a 5-course curriculum, designed for groups, focusing on the Gospel of Luke that will be free to anyone who wants to take it during the entire Lenten season.

​Presiding Bishop Michael Curry has invited people to read and contemplate the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles as part of the Good Book Club from Feb. 11-May 20. ChurchNext created Luke the Liberator with 5 expert presenters as part of the Good Book Club’s mission. The curriculum’s title emphasizes Luke’s drive to set captives free through the message of Jesus. Click here for more details.

Meeting Jesus in John
http://meetingjesusinjohn.org/
Have you ever wished to deepen your relationship with God? To experience a warm friendship with God? Maybe even fall in love with God – again – or for the very first time? "Meeting Jesus" is a six-week journey and reflection on the Gospel According to John, starting Lent 2018.

Free materials are available to download, including a prayer journal, facilitation guidance for small groups (and more) from the Center for the Ministry of Teaching at Virginia Theological Seminary. It also includes videos from the monks of the Society of St. John the Evangelist. Watch a video about the series here.

Civil Discourse Curriculum
http://advocacy.episcopalchurch.org/resources
The Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations has developed a five-week Civil Discourse Curriculum, focusing on civil discourse and designed to guide discussions about politics, policy, and legislation, while strengthening our relationships with one another. It was designed as a five-week program to be used during Lent, but also can be used at any point in the year. It's available at no cost here.

Resources for home and classroom from Building Faith (VTS)
The Building Faith website (buildfaith.org) has many ideas for observing Lent in your home, including how to create a Lenten prayer space, recommendations for books, and much more. 
Visit https://www.buildfaith.org/lent/
Building Faith is a ministry of Virginia Theological Seminary.

Order of St. Helena offers retreats

The Order of St. Helena, an Episcopal women's monastic community, offers Silent Weekend Retreats at their convent in North Augusta, SC, including one during Lent (March 2-4). Read about these retreats here.
Lent Madness 2018
lentmadness.org
Each year at Lent, people worldwide participate in Lent Madness, the “saintly smackdown” in which 32 saints do battle to win the coveted Golden Halo. Calling itself the world’s most popular online Lenten devotion, Lent Madness brings together cut-throat competition, the lives of the saints, humor, and the chance to see how God works in the lives of women and men across all walks of life. See the 2018 Brackets here.



Holy Week & Easter Activities Around the Diocese

posted May 23, 2016, 3:48 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Mar 19, 2018, 7:18 PM ]

Holy Week Services

Palm Sunday - March 25
Learn about Palm Sunday here
All Saints, Hilton Head Island: 8:00 a.m. and 10:15 a.m. services
Calvary, Charleston: 10:30 a.m. Palm Sunday service
Cheraw: 10:30 a.m. Palm Sunday service.
East Cooper Episcopal Church 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist 
Episcopal Church on Edisto 9:45 a.m. Blessing of Palms and Procession; 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist
Epiphany, Summerville: 9:00 a.m. beginning with The Liturgy of the Palms in the Parish Hall and concluding with the Passion narrative in the church.
Good Shepherd, Summerville: 10:30 a.m. Liturgy of the Palms and Reading of The Passion: Holy Eucharist Rite II
Grace Church Cathedral: Liturgy of the Palms and Eucharist at all 3 services with the Rev. Martin Smith, preacher: 8:00, 9:00, and 11:00 a.m.
Choral Evensong at 4:00 p.m.
Holy Communion, Charleston: 8:00 a.m. Said Mass. 10:30 a.m. Solemn Mass. 
Holy Communion, Allendale: ​11:00 a.m. Palm and Passion Sunday
Holy Communion, Charleston: 8:00 a.m. Low Mass and Sermon. 6:30 p.m. Low Mass and Sermon.
Holy Cross Faith Memorial, Pawleys Island: 8:00 a.m. Palm Sunday services 
10:30 a.m. Palm Sunday service 
Church of the Messiah, Myrtle Beach: 10:00 a.m Blessing of the Palms in the Churchyard followed by Holy Eucharist
St. Alban's, Kingstree: 8:00 a.m. Liturgy of the Palms, with Passion Reading
St. Catherine's, Florence: 11:30 a.m. Liturgy of the Palms and the Reading of the Passion.
St. George's, Summerville: Liturgy of the Palms, Passion Gospel and Holy Eucharist at 7:45, 9:00, 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. (Children's Palm Sunday Service at 10:15 a.m.)
St. James-Santee, McClellanville: 10:00 a.m. Palm Sunday Service.
St. Mark's, Charleston: 10:00 a.m. Palm Sunday service.
St. Mark's, Port Royal/Beaufort: 9:00 a.m. Blessing of Palms, Procession and Holy Eucharist. 11:00 a.m. Blessing of Palms, Procession and Holy Eucharist.
St. Stephen's, Charleston: 8:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. Palm Sunday services. The 11:00 a.m. service begins outdoors with the Blessing of the Palms.
St. Stephen's, North Myrtle Beach: 8:00 a.m. Liturgy of the Palms and Holy Eucharistl 10:30 a.m. Liturgy of the Palms and Holy Eucharist. 
St. Stephen's, St. Stephen: 10:00 a.m. Liturgy of the Palms, with Passion Reading.
St. Thomas, North Charleston: 8:00 a.m. Palm Sunday service. 10:30 a.m. Palm Sunday service with bagpipe procession, followed by Soup & Bread Luncheon.


Monday in Holy Week - March 26
Grace Church Cathedral: 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist with the Rev. Martin Smith, preacher
Holy Communion, Charleston: 8:00 a.m. Low Mass and Sermon. 6:30 p.m. Low Mass and Sermon.
Holy Cross Faith Memorial, Pawleys Island: 12:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist 
St. George's, Summerville: 7:00 p.m. Mary's Way of the Cross. Follow the mother of Jesus as she walks the road to Calvary where Jesus was crucified, emphasizing her sense of surrender.
St. Stephen's, North Myrtle Beach: 10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist.

Tuesday in Holy Week - March 27
Grace Church Cathedral: 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist with the Rev. Martin Smith, preacher
Holy Communion, Charleston: 8:00 a.m. Low Mass and Sermon. 6:30 p.m. Low Mass and Sermon.
Holy Cross Faith Memorial, Pawleys Island: 12:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist
St. George's, Summerville: 12:10 p.m. Holy Tuesday Healing Service. Prayers for healing, anointing with oil and communion from the reserved sacrament, with special prayers of intercession for the parish and community.
St. Stephen's, North Myrtle Beach: 10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist.

Wednesday in Holy Week - March 28
Grace Church Cathedral: 5:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist with the Rev. Martin Smith, preacher
Holy Cross Faith Memorial, Pawleys Island: 12:30 p.m. Holy Eucharist
Holy Communion, Charleston: 8:00 a.m. Low Mass and Sermon. 6:30 p.m. Low Mass and Sermon.
St. Stephen's, North Myrtle Beach: 10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist.
St. Stephen's, St. Stephen: 6:30 p.m. Tenebrae service. (Tenebrae is the traditional Latin name for the monastic offices of matins and lauds for the last three days in Holy Week, which are here combined in this devotion The distinctive feature from which the name of the service (“darkness” or “shadows”) derives is the gradual extinguishing of fourteen candles on a triangular candlestick called a hearse, along with the other lights in the church.)

Maundy Thursday  - March 29
Learn about Maundy Thursday here
All Saints, Hilton Head Island: 
10:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. services
Calvary, Charleston: 6:30 p.m. Maundy Thursday service
Cheraw: 5:30 p.m. Maundy Thursday service.
East Cooper Episcopal Church 7:00 p.m. Maundy Thursday Service (held at All Saints Lutheran Church, Highway 17 N. in Mt. Pleasant)​
Episcopal Church on Edisto6:00 p.m. service
Good Shepherd, Summerville: 6:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist, Rite II
Epiphany, Summerville: 7:00 p.m. Footwashing, Lord's Supper and Stripping of the Altar
Grace Church Cathedral: 7:00 pm Choral Eucharist, Washing of Feet, Stripping of the Altar, with the Rev. Martin Smith, preacher
Holy Communion, Charleston: 6:30 p.m. Solemn Mass, Stripping of the Altar and Vigil at the Altar of Repose. Child care provided.
Holy Cross Faith Memorial, Pawleys Island: 7:00 p.m. Maundy Thursday liturgy, followed by the Gethsemane Watch from Thursday evening until 12:30 p.m. on Good Friday. 
Church of the Messiah, Myrtle Beach: 12:15 p.m. Liturgy of the Lord's Supper (jointly with St. Philip Lutheran Church)
7:00 p.m. Liturgy of the Lord's Supper (jointly with St. Philip Lutheran Church)
St. Alban's, Kingstree: 7:00 p.m. Maundy Thursday Mass with Stripping of the Altar. (Combined service with St. Catherine's, Florence, and St. Stephen's, St. Stephen.
St. Catherine's, Florence: The congregation will join St. Alban's, Kingstree at 7:00 p.m. for the Maundy Thursday service.
St. George's, Summerville: 7:00 p.m. Footwashing, Holy Eucharist and stripping of the altar.
St. James-Santee, McClellanville: 6:30 p.m. Eucharist and Footwashing 
St. Mark's, Charleston: 6:00 p.m. Maundy Thursday service.
St. Mark's, Port Royal/Beaufort: 7:00 p.m. Holy Eucharist and Stripping of the Altar.
St. Stephen's, Charleston: 5:30 p.m. Maundy Thursday Liturgy with Foot Washing followed by a Vigil with the reserved sacrament until midnight.
St. Stephen's, North Myrtle Beach: 6:00 p.m. The Ceremony of Foot Washing, The Commemorative Celebration of The Lord’s Supper, & The Solemn Stripping of the Altar.
St. Stephen's, St. Stephen: The congregation will join St. Alban's, Kingstree at 7:00 p.m. for the Maundy Thursday service.
St. Thomas, North Charleston: 7:00 p.m. Maundy Thursday service.

Good Friday - March 30
Learn about Good Friday here

All Saints, Hilton Head Island: 
12:00 p.m. Good Friday Liturgy.
Calvary, Charleston: 12:00 p.m. Good Friday Liturgy.
Episcopal Church on Edisto 12:00 p.m. Good Friday liturgy
Epiphany, Summerville: 12:00 p.m. Good Friday BCP service. 7:00 p.m. BCP Service and the Seven Last Words of Christ from the Cross. 
Good Shepherd, Summerville: 12:00 p.m. Good Friday liturgy
Grace Church Cathedral: 12:00 p.m. Good Friday liturgy with the Rev. Martin Smith, preacher
Holy Communion, Charleston: 12:00 pm Low Mass Liturgy, Veneration of the Cross and Preaching of the Passion. 5:30p.m. Stations of the Cross. 6:30 p.m. Solemn High Liturgy, Veneration of the Cross, Preaching of the Passion.
Holy Cross Faith Memorial, Pawleys Island: 12:30 p.m. Good Friday Liturgy
Church of the Messiah, Myrtle Beach: 12:15 p.m. Good Friday Liturgy (jointly with St. Philip Lutheran Church)
7:00 p.m. Good Friday Liturgy (jointly with St. Philip Lutheran Church)
St. Alban's, Kingstree: 6:00 p.m. Solemn Liturgy and Sacrament from the Altar of Repose (Community Service). 
St. Catherine's, Florence, 12:00 p.m. Solemn Liturgy and Sacrament from the Altar of Repose.​
St. George's, Summerville: 12:00 p.m. Good Friday Service (Prayer Book liturgy)
7:00 p.m. Service of the Nails
St. James-Santee, McClellanville: 12:00 p.m. Good Friday Service.
St. Mark's, Charleston: 12:00 p.m. Good Friday Liturgy. 6:00 p.m. Stations of the Cross.
St. Mark's, Port Royal/Beaufort: 12:00 p.m. Good Friday Liturgy. 5:30 p.m. Good Friday Liturgy. 
St. Stephen's, North Myrtle Beach: 3:00 p.m. The Nailing of the Cross & Stations of the Cross.
St. Stephen's, St. Stephen: 3:00 p.m. Solemn Liturgy,  Veneration of the Cross and Eucharist from the Altar of Repose.
St. Thomas, North Charleston: 12:00-3:00 p.m. Good Friday service.

Holy Saturday - March 31
(Please see 'Easter Services' on the righthand side of this page for churches offering the Great Vigil of Easter on March 31)
St. Alban's, Kingstree: 12:00 p.m. Liturgy for Holy Saturday
St. George's, Summerville: Holy Saturday, Easter All Around: Kids' and Families' Easter experience in the CE building followed by an Easter Egg Hunt on the church grounds.
St. Stephen's, Charleston: 10:00 a.m. Service
St. Stephen's, North Myrtle Beach: 5:00 p.m. Waiting in the Tomb with Jesus
SaveSaveSave
Easter Services
Easter Eve - March 31:
​The Great Vigil of Easter
Learn about this liturgy here


All Saints, Hilton Head Island: 8:00 p.m. The Great Vigil of Easter, with Baptism
Grace Church Cathedral: 7:00 pm The Great Vigil of Easter 
Holy Communion, Charleston: 8:00 p.m. The Great Vigil of Easter
St. Stephen's, Charleston: 8:00 p.m. The Great Vigil of Easter

Easter Day, April 1
Learn more about Easter here


All Saints, Hilton Head Island: 8:00 a.m. Easter Service. 10:15 a.m. Easter Service, followed by Children's Egg Hunt.
Calvary, Charleston: 10:30 a.m. Easter Service
Cheraw: 10:30 a.m. at Old St. David's Church, 98 2nd St, Cheraw, SC 29520
East Cooper Episcopal Church 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist 
Episcopal Church on Edisto9:45 a.m. Flowering of the cross, 10:00 a.m. Easter service​.
Epiphany, Summerville: 9:00 a.m. Festival Eucharist
Good Shepherd, Summerville: 10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist Rite II
Good Shepherd, Sumter: 8:30 a.m. Easter Service
Grace Church Cathedral: 8:00 a.m. Choral Eucharist
9:30 a.m. Choral Eucharist with Brass & Timpani
​11:15 a.m. Choral Eucharist with Brass & Timpani
Heavenly Rest, Estill: 9:00 a.m. Holy Communion
Holy Communion, Allendale: 25 11:00 a.m. Holy Communion
Holy Communion, Charleston: 8:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
Holy Cross Faith Memorial, Pawleys Island: 8:00 a.m. Easter Service & Holy Eucharist
10:30 a.m. Easter Service & Holy Eucharist, and Bishop's Annual Visitation

Church of the Messiah, Myrtle Beach: 9:45 a.m. Festival Eucharist of the Resurrection (note the time shift for Easter Day)
St. Alban's, Kingstree:  7:00 a.m. Community Sunrise Service in the Churchyard. Easter Day Service of Holy Eucharist immediately following the Community Sunrise Service.
St. Augustine's, Wedgefield: 11:30 a.m. Easter Service

St. Catherine's, Florence: 11:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist including The Renewal of Baptismal vows with the Asperges.
St. George's, Summerville: 7:45 a.m. Easter Service. 9:00 a.m. Easter Service and Fflowering of the Cross. 11:15 a.m. Easter Service.
​​St. James-Santee, McClellanville: 10:00 a.m. Easter Day Holy Eucharist. High Tea Time and Egg Hunt after the service.
St. Mark's, Charleston: 10:00 a.m. Easter Day service.
St. Mark's, Port Royal/Beaufort: 9:00 a.m. Flowering of the Cross and Holy Eucharist. 11:00 a.m. Flowering of the Cross and Holy Eucharist.
St. Stephen's, Charleston: 9:00 a.m. Easter Day service with Baptism. 10:15 a.m. Easter Egg Hunt. 11:00 a.m. Easter SErvice. All are welcome to bring a flower for flowering of the Easter Cross. Child care provided at both services.
St. Stephen's, North Myrtle Beach: 7:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist. 9:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist. 11:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist.
St. Stephen's, St. Stephen: 10:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist and the Renewal of Baptismal vows with the Asperges.
St. Thomas, North Charleston: 8:00 a.m. Easter Day Service. 10:30 a.m. Easter Day Service, followed by Easter Reception and Egg Hunt.

The Episcopal Church's
Good Friday Offering

The history of the Good Friday Offering reaches back to 1922 when, in the aftermath of World War I, The Episcopal Church sought to create new relationships with and among the Christians of the Middle East. 

Through the years many Episcopalians have found the Good Friday Offering to be an effective way to express their support for the ministries of the four dioceses of the Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East. Pastoral care, education and health care continue to be primary ministries through which the reconciling spirit of the Christian faith serves all in need.

The generous donations of Episcopalians help the Christian presence in the Land of the Holy One to be a vital and effective force for peace and understanding among all of God’s children.

Lenten Devotionals from Presiding Bishop Michael Curry

posted Mar 13, 2016, 11:55 AM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Mar 2, 2018, 12:53 PM ]

Lent

Early Christians observed "a season of penitence and fasting" in preparation for the Paschal feast, or Pascha (BCP, pp. 264-265). The season now known as Lent (from an Old English word meaning "spring," the time of lengthening days) has a long history. Originally, in places where Pascha was celebrated on a Sunday, the Paschal feast followed a fast of up to two days. In the third century this fast was lengthened to six days. Eventually this fast became attached to, or overlapped, another fast of forty days, in imitation of Christ's fasting in the wilderness. The forty-day fast was especially important for converts to the faith who were preparing for baptism, and for those guilty of notorious sins who were being restored to the Christian assembly. In the western church the forty days of Lent extend from Ash Wednesday through Holy Saturday, omitting Sundays. The last three days of Lent are the sacred Triduum of Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday. Today Lent has reacquired its significance as the final preparation of adult candidates for baptism. Joining with them, all Christians are invited "to the observance of a holy Lent, by self-examination and repentance; by prayer, fasting, and self-denial; and by reading and meditating on God's holy Word" (BCP, p. 265).




http://episcopaldigitalnetwork.com/stw/bulletin-inserts/

March 25, 2018

The Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday

The Episcopal Church | Leave a Comment |

“Let these branches be for us signs of his victory, and grant that we who bear them in his name may ever hail him as our King, and follow him in the way that leads to eternal life.”

Today is the first day of Holy Week and the last Sunday in Lent, known as Palm Sunday or the Sunday of the Passion. The day begins by marking Christ’s triumphal entry into Jerusalem. Many churches participate in the Liturgy of the Palms, first offered in The Episcopal Church in the 1960 Book of Offices. In this liturgy, the celebrant blesses palms or other branches, and, following a reading from the Gospels, leads the congregation in procession into their church—often singing “All Glory, Laud, and Honor” or “Ride On! Ride On In Majesty!”

This liturgy evokes the early observances of Palm Sunday. According to Armentrout and Slocum’s An Episcopal Dictionary of the Church (Church Publishing, 2000), by the year 381, the faithful would process from the Mount of Olives into Jerusalem, waving palm or olive branches. As they processed, they sang songs from Scripture – including the exultant antiphon of Psalm 118 sung at Christ’s entrance into the city: “Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!”

When the Palm Sunday service includes the Eucharist, the Liturgy of the Palms is followed by the salutation and the collect of the day. Afterward, the tone of the service shifts noticeably. In contrast to the earlier song of joy, Psalm 31, appointed for today, cries, “For I have heard the whispering of the crowd; fear is all around; they put their heads together against me; they plot to take my life.” The Gospel reading is likewise sorrowful, recalling the events of Jesus’ Passion (that is, the events and suffering before and during his death). Still, we are reminded throughout the difficult days ahead that this is not the end of the story.

Despite the Savior’s death on the cross, he promises to rise again. The Man of Sorrows remains the one at whose name, “every knee should bend, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, [and] every tongue should confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father” (Philippians 2:10-11).

Collect for the Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday  

This prayer is a contemporary version of the collect for “The Sonday next before Easter” in the 1549 Book of Common Prayer. The day was not referred to as Palm Sunday in an official capacity until the 1928 Prayer Book added “Commonly called Palm Sunday” to the prayer’s title. The doxology at the end of the prayer was appended in the 1979 Prayer Book.

Almighty and everliving God, in your tender love for the human race you sent your Son our Savior Jesus Christ to take upon him our nature, and to suffer death upon the cross, giving us the example of his great humility: Mercifully grant that we may walk in the way of his suffering, and also share in his resurrection; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen (Book of Common Prayer, p. 219).



March 18, 2018

The Good Friday Offering

The Episcopal Church

“Christian Presence”

Most of us are not concerned about Christians being present where we live. Most of us take it for granted that Christians have been and will continue to be a part of the fabric of our neighborhoods. This is not the case in what we often call the “Holy Land”. We have seen the results of enormous pressure brought upon Christians in Iraq, Syria and elsewhere to leave their homes under the onslaught of fundamentalism. Tens of thousands have become refugees. Political realities in the West Bank, East Jerusalem, and Gaza have limited access to education, health care and opportunities which have prompted some families to re-locate. Numbers are very politically charged, but it is safe to say that something far less than 10% of the population in the region are made up of indigenous Christians.

The importance of Christians living and working in the region is essential to a civil society. Christians provide a vital bridge between Muslims and Jews through organizations like the Council of Religious Institutions of the Holy Land, meeting in Jerusalem, which brings together leaders of all three Abrahamic faiths for discussion on topics of common concern.

Education, health programs and pastoral care are the essential tools which are used throughout the Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East which bring people together and provide examples of day to day cooperation and efforts to build a shared future to benefit all. Teachers and students; doctors, nurses and patients; clergy immersed in an inter-faith context all bear witness to the love of Christ in their relationships throughout the region.

The Good Friday Offering is a response from throughout the Episcopal Church in support of Christians in the Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East. Our church-wide effort to provide meaningful support for these “living stones” of the faith we share in Jesus Christ gives them hope for a future where perhaps, by God’s grace, we will no longer have to be concerned about the ongoing presence of Christians throughout the region where our Lord lived, died and rose again.


March 11, 2018

The Feast of St. Patrick

The Episcopal Church

Each year the Episcopal Church celebrates the Feast Day of Saint Patrick, fifth-century bishop and missionary of Ireland, on March 17, the day of his death in 461.

Holy Women, Holy Men (Church Publishing, 2010) relates that Patrick was born on the northwest coast of Britain in about 390. His grandfather had been a Christian priest, and his father was a deacon in the early Christian church. When Patrick was a teenager, he was captured by a band of Irish slavers and was forcibly taken to Ireland to serve as a shepherd. When Patrick was in his early 20s, he escaped and returned to Britain, where he was educated as a Christian. After taking holy orders as both presbyter and bishop, he had a vision, calling him to return to Ireland.

Sometime around the year 431, when Patrick returned to Ireland, he began converting Irish pagans into Christians by appealing to the local kings, and through them to their tribes. Patrick built Christian churches over sacred pagan sites, carved crosses on old druidic pillars, and protected sacred wells and springs with Christian saints.

Saint Patrick is generally credited with being the first bishop of Armagh, Primate of All Ireland.

Saint Patrick’s Day, March 17, is celebrated as both a liturgical and non-liturgical holiday. In popular culture, this feast day is often a celebration of Ireland itself.

Collect for Saint Patrick

Almighty God, in your providence you chose your servant Patrick to be the apostle of the Irish people, to bring those who were wandering in darkness and error to the true light and knowledge of you: Grant us so to walk in that light that we may come at last to the light of everlasting life; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.


March 4, 2018

The Presiding Bishop’s Lent 3 Devotional

The Most Rev. Michael B. Curry

Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop and Primate Michael Curry joined the leaders of the Anglican Church of Canada, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada, and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America in preparing Lenten Devotions for the season. The full set of devotions, “Set Free by Truth,” can be found and printed at bit.ly/lentendevotional.

“But we proclaim Christ crucified”

Some things just don’t make much sense. Water doesn’t become wine, bread and fish do not suddenly multiply, the lame do not jump up and walk. And most certainly, dead people stay dead, especially those who experience the horrific death of crucifixion!

And yet, where Jesus is involved, all kinds of things that don’t make much sense…happen.

In those earliest years of the Jesus Movement, his followers didn’t wear crosses around their necks or hang them in the homes in which they worshipped. They had other symbols, certainly, but not crosses. Crucifixion was not a historical curiosity, but a still present reality, and an agonizing and shameful one at that. To be crucified was to be executed as a common criminal. Worse, according to the Hebrew Scriptures, cursed was one who hung on a tree, on the wood of a cross.

So to speak of “Christ crucified” didn’t make sense to many. It was a stumbling block, something foolish or offensive. But Paul said otherwise. Yes, Jesus could have avoided the cross, found some other way around it. But instead he faced the worst the world could throw at him, and then broke through death itself, and left an empty cross behind as witness to his astonishing victory.

Some things don’t make much sense. The cross is one of them. But it stands now and forever as our rallying cry that God—not injustice, not suffering, not even death—has the final, victorious word.

Presiding Bishop Michael Curry
The Episcopal Church

Prayer

“Lord Jesus Christ, you stretched out your arms of love on the hard wood of the cross that everyone might come within the reach of your saving embrace.”


February 25, 2018

Invitation to the Good Friday Offering

The Episcopal Church

Presiding Bishop Curry wrote in the annual Good Friday letter to all bishops and congregations asking them to consider providing assistance for the Province of Jerusalem and the Middle East.

Information, including bulletin covers and bulletin inserts on the Good Friday Offering, is available at episcopalchurch.org/good-friday-offering.

Dear Brothers and Sisters,

I greet you in the Name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

I am writing to you in preparation for Holy Week and the focus of that week on our Lord’s sacrificial offering of love on the cross.

The Good Friday Offering is one way we in the Episcopal Church help to support the ongoing ministry of love and compassion carried out by our Anglican sisters and brothers throughout the Province of Jerusalem and Middle East.

Whether funding an eye clinic in Aden or women’s programs, schools and medical services in the West Bank, the Good Friday Offering is making a difference in the lives of so many. I believe our partnership with those who keep the faith of Jesus alive in the region where our Lord walked and began his movement is a significant aspect of our work as part of the church catholic.

I hope you will participate in this effort. Information is available at episcopalchurch.org/good-friday-offering which offers bulletin covers, bulletin inserts, and other helpful information. Any questions about this program may be directed to the Rev. Canon Robert Edmunds, our Middle East Partnership Officer. He can be reached at redmunds@episcopalchurch.org.

Thank you for considering this important witness to the love of Jesus across our Church and in the Holy Land. May God bless you and keep you always. I remain

Your brother in Christ,

The Most Rev. Michael Curry
Presiding Bishop and Primate
The Episcopal Church


February 18, 2018

For Such a Time As This: Protect and Support Indigenous People

The Episcopal Public Policy Network

As Episcopalians, we are taught that it is our duty to not only follow and worship Christ, but also to “work, pray, and give for the spread of the kingdom of God.” Approximately 1.9 million American Indians and Alaska Natives, whose ancestors had taken from them millions of acres of land that makes the United States what it is today, have been and still are subjected to various forms of physical and social injustices.

As Christians and Americans, we have an obligation to work, pray, and give to respond to and end those injustices. Let us lift our voices and ask our members of Congress to protect funding for programs that provide relief, promote public safety, and support a meaningful livelihood for American Indians and Alaska Natives.

On February 21, join the Episcopal Public Policy Network and the Presiding Bishops of the Episcopal Church and the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America as we pray, fast, and act.

Pray for our nation’s elected leaders and for all who struggle with hunger and poverty.

Look with pity, O heavenly Father, upon the people in this land who live with injustice, terror, disease, and death as their constant companions. Have mercy upon us. Help us to eliminate our cruelty to these our neighbors. Strengthen those who spend their lives establishing equal protection of the law and equal opportunities for all. And grant that every one of us may enjoy a fair portion of the riches of this land; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.                    from the Book of Common Prayer, pg. 826

Fast to call attention in our own minds and actions the needs and circumstances of the poorest among us.

Join us on social media using #PrayFastAct and @TheEPPN. On the 21st, post a picture of a dinner place setting with the reason you are fasting this month.

Act: Prepare for action…

  • by reading this one-pager on protecting Indigenous People: bit.ly/FSATindigenous
  • by asking Congress to support programs aimed at reducing poverty and protecting American Indians and Alaska Natives.
  • by reading the testimony of the National Congress of American Indians before the House Appropriations Committee Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science and Related Agencies expressing, on behalf of Native Americans and Alaska Natives, expressing the need for public safety and business support: bit.ly/FSATtestimony
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ECW OYSTER ROAST IS CANCELLED - Saturday, April 7, 2018 ** CANCELLED **.

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The Gathering at the Table Group meets on Tuesdays 5:30 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

posted Sep 28, 2015, 2:19 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Mar 10, 2018, 2:23 AM ]







The Gathering at the Table group was formed through the initiative of Judith Ewing, an Episcopal deacon who serves at East Cooper Episcopal Church.  She sought out the Rev. Michael Burton, a supply priest at Calvary, about setting up an initial gathering.  Members of Calvary Episcopal Church and members of East Cooper Episcopal Church meet in the Calvary Church Parish Hall each Tuesday evening to share their perspectives on matters of race - past and present. 

Originally scheduled to meet for four weeks in October, 2015, the group has bonded and grown in their commitment.  They continue to meet, entertaining lively and healing discussions.  All are invited and encouraged to attend.




  • The Gatherers visited the National Museum of African American History in Washington, DC on August 28 - 30, 2017.
  • The East Cooper Episcopal Church has a new home. They now hold Sunday services at 10:00 A.M. at the J. Henry Stuhr Mount Pleasant Chapel at 1494 Mathis Ferry Road, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464
  • The Gatherers attended the dedication ceremony at the Penn Center in Beaufort, SC and were excited to speak with The Honorable James Clyburn after his presentation.
    Members pictured here left to right: Wallace and Joan Bonaparte, Congressman Clyburn, Hannah Heyward and Masha Britten.

  • The Gatherers viewed the movie 13th and are holding ongoing discussions.











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'Gather Around the Table'

Friday, June 17, marks one year since the night a gunman took the lives of nine people at Emanuel AME Church. As we remember this anniversary, may we pause in prayer for the people who died, for those who still mourn, and for every life that was irrevocably affected by the tragedy of that night in 2015.

The following article represents one way in which people in The Episcopal Church in South Carolina are responding after Emanuel to seek a path toward understanding and reconciliation. In the days ahead, we encourage others to share their stories, too.

O God, it is your will to hold both heaven and earth in a single peace. Let the design of your great love shine on the pains of our woundedness, confusion and great sorrow, and continue to bring peace to our community, peace to your Church, peace among peoples, and peace in our homes. And may the balm of your reconciling love lived out among us continue to soothe our suffering hearts. All this we pray in name of our wounded and risen Savior, God with us, Jesus Christ. Amen.

​It’s a June evening in Charleston, and the back door of the church is unlocked. People come in at their own pace, embracing, smiling, setting down plates of cookies on the big table in the parish hall.

No one speaks of it yet, but on everyone’s mind is a June evening in Charleston almost one year earlier, when nine people were shot dead just a mile away at Emanuel AME Church, in an African American congregation that opened its doors and invited the killer into their weekly Bible study.

The horror of June 17, 2015 and the days that followed gave way to deep grief, and deep questions. How could this have happened? What could I be doing to change that? How can we find bridges across the barriers of race?

Every Tuesday night, a small group from two local Episcopal churches, East Cooper and Calvary, have been meeting to see if they can find some answers. The name they have given themselves reflects the simple agenda for the group: “Gatherers Around the Table.”

After the massacre at Mother Emanuel, The Episcopal Church in South Carolina accelerated its plan to offer anti-racism training for the diocese – training that is required by Episcopal Church canons, but was never offered until a rift in 2012 brought new leadership. Bishop Charles G. vonRosenberg, who took office in January 2013, immediately put anti-racism training on his  short-list of needs for the reorganizing diocese, and the first one was on the calendar when the Emanuel tragedy struck.

In September 2015, Calvary hosted one of four “Traces of the Trade” conferences offered around the diocese. Each event encouraged people to open their minds and hearts to conversations about the legacy of slavery and racism.

Judith Ewing, an Episcopal deacon who serves at East Cooper, was at the Calvary program. “I realized how ignorant I was,” she said. “I realized the importance of relationships, of just getting to know each other. I just knew we needed to gather at the table.”
 
She quickly sought out the Rev. Michael Burton, a supply priest at Calvary, about setting up an initial gathering. The first one happened in October: Six people from each congregation, who committed to meeting every Tuesday for a trial run of six weeks.

Like Emanuel, Calvary has deep roots in Charleston’s history, founded in 1847 for “religious instruction” of enslaved African Americans. For years, it housed the only preschool and kindergarten for African American children on the Charleston peninsula, and many leaders passed through its doors. The first black jurist to serve on an appellate court in the United States, Jonathan Jasper Wright, was buried in its churchyard in 1885.

By comparison, the East Cooper Episcopal Church is in its infancy. Approved as a new mission congregation at Diocesan Convention in 2014, it serves the predominantly white suburbs across the Cooper River from Charleston. It was formed by Episcopalians who were left without a place to worship when churches in that area went with the breakaway group that left The Episcopal Church in 2012.
 
With widely different backgrounds, the two groups shared one common characteristic: Curiosity, and a desire to learn about each other.
 
Their first meeting was planned as a simple Bible study, “because that would be sweet and safe and nobody would say anything that will upset anybody,” Ewing said. “But I said, ‘Maybe we need to say things that upset people.’”
 
Artist and educator Marlene O’Bryant-Seabrook was there, and had the same reaction. Ewing recalls her saying: “I’ve been to many Bible studies, and nobody ever mentions the elephant in the middle of the room. Why can’t we mention the elephant in the room?”
 
Eight months later, the elephant is still loose. Trayvon Martin and Freddie Gray. The challenges of growing up in a mixed-race family. Assumptions about intelligence. Co-workers who act friendly, but never get close. The Spoleto production of “Porgy and Bess.” Ethnic foods they like and dislike. It’s all on the table when they gather.
 
“We’ve never put aside anything, or say ‘We mustn’t talk about that.’ We talk about everything,” Deacon Ewing says.
 

Along the way, others have joined. One member recently moved from New York after years in churches that were active in social justice issues, looking for a community in Charleston where that could keep happening. Another regular Gatherer is a social worker from another church who came with an East Cooper friend.  “I thought I knew almost everything about black culture, especially in Charleston,” she says, laughing. “But I don’t.”

Dr. O’Bryant-Seabrook, a Calvary member in her 80s, has become the group’s matriarch and historian. On the recent Tuesday night in June, she gave them all an assignment: Come up with a personal statement about why they came to be “Gatherers Around the Table,” and then create a small journal-quilt to illustrate it. A few skeptical looks were exchanged around the table, but the group quickly warmed up to the task of explaining why they come to the meetings week after week.
 
The Tuesday before the Emanuel anniversary, they were putting the final touches on their letter-sized pieces of fabric art filled with color, symbols, and words like Curious, Sharing, Understanding, Love, and Hope. Beside an image of Emanuel, one proclaims: “Hate Will Not Win!”
 
As a child growing up in Charleston, Dr. O’Bryant-Seabrook says, “I could not go three blocks without passing a church. I remember asking my mother, ‘I would like to know what they’re praying for.’ With all the inequities and oppression, I wondered, were they praying for something that black churches were not praying for?”
 
Decades later, those questions persist. “I wanted to be a part of this group because for a long, long, long, long time, I wanted to be comfortable in a group of caucasians and blacks where we can actually, openly, honestly and safely discuss what happens, and why it happens,” she says.

As the members of the group went around the room, the words “safe place” came up again and again.
 
“When we started, we said we weren’t’ going to judge, or say “You shouldn’t be saying that,” Deacon Ewing says. “We were going to accept each one in our knowledge and our ignorance, and love each other anyway.”
 
As the gathering wraps up, the group continues to share their ideas as they pass the plates of cookies around the table. “When you eat with somebody, it changes the whole dynamic,” one woman says. “It gives me a lot of hope.”
 
In the words of Anne Nietert’s journal quilt: “Anger exploded into the Palmetto night, but, in the shadows, a new day is dawning as we Gather at the Table to learn, to listen, and to love.” 
 
Holly Behre, Director of Communications
The Episcopal Church in South Carolina

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