What's Happening at Calvary

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/first-black-episcopal-church-leader-will-continue-his-fathers-teachings/2015/10/14/bede82e2-72b2-11e5-8d93-0af317ed58c9_story.html http://www.episcopalchurchsc.org/lent-2016.html https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/episcopal-church-installs-its-first-african-american-bishop/2015/11/01/d9b7c44c-80d2-11e5-9afb-0c971f713d0c_story.htmlhttps://www.washingtonpost.com/local/social-issues/episcopal-church-installs-its-first-african-american-bishop/2015/11/01/d9b7c44c-80d2-11e5-9afb-0c971f713d0c_story.html

READINGS AND GOSPELS: The Second Sunday After The Epiphany - Sunday, January 20, 2019

posted Dec 10, 2016, 12:55 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jan 14, 2019, 2:35 PM ]







Second Sunday after the Epiphany

Sunday, January 20, 2019
Year (cycle):  C

The Collect: 

Almighty God, whose Son our Savior Jesus Christ is the light of the world: Grant that your people, illumined by your Word and Sacraments, may shine with the radiance of Christ's glory, that he may be known, worshiped, and obeyed to the ends of the earth; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who with you and the Holy Spirit lives and reigns, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

Old Testament: 
Isaiah 62:1-5

1 For Zion’s sake I will not keep silent,
   and for Jerusalem’s sake I will not rest,
until her vindication shines out like the dawn,
   and her salvation like a burning torch.
2 The nations shall see your vindication,
   and all the kings your glory;
and you shall be called by a new name
   that the mouth of the Lord will give.
3 You shall be a crown of beauty in the hand of the Lord,
   and a royal diadem in the hand of your God.
4 You shall no more be termed Forsaken,
   and your land shall no more be termed Desolate;
but you shall be called My Delight Is in Her,
   and your land Married;
for the Lord delights in you,
   and your land shall be married.
5 For as a young man marries a young woman,
   so shall your builder marry you,
and as the bridegroom rejoices over the bride,
   so shall your God rejoice over you.

Psalm: 
Psalm 36:5–10

5 Your love, O Lord, reaches to the heavens, *
       and your faithfulness to the clouds.
6 Your righteousness is like the strong mountains,
   your justice like the great deep; *
      you save both man and beast, O Lord.
7 How priceless is your love, O God! *
      your people take refuge under the
                              shadow of your wings.
8 They feast upon the abundance of your house; *
      you give them drink from the river of your delights.
9 For with you is the well of life, *
      and in your light we see light.
10 Continue your loving-kindness to those who know you, *
       and your favor to those who are true of heart.

Epistle: 
1 Corinthians 12:1–11

1 Now concerning spiritual gifts, brothers and sisters, I do not want you to be uninformed. 2You know that when you were pagans, you were enticed and led astray to idols that could not speak. 3Therefore I want you to understand that no one speaking by the Spirit of God ever says ‘Let Jesus be cursed!’ and no one can say ‘Jesus is Lord’ except by the Holy Spirit.

Now there are varieties of gifts, but the same Spirit; 5and there are varieties of services, but the same Lord; 6and there are varieties of activities, but it is the same God who activates all of them in everyone. 7To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good. 8To one is given through the Spirit the utterance of wisdom, and to another the utterance of knowledge according to the same Spirit, 9to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healing by the one Spirit, 10to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another the discernment of spirits, to another various kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues. 11All these are activated by one and the same Spirit, who allots to each one individually just as the Spirit chooses.

Gospel: 
John 2:1–11

1On the third day there was a wedding in Cana of Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there. 2Jesus and his disciples had also been invited to the wedding. 3When the wine gave out, the mother of Jesus said to him, ‘They have no wine.’ 4And Jesus said to her, ‘Woman, what concern is that to you and to me? My hour has not yet come.’ 5His mother said to the servants, ‘Do whatever he tells you.’ 6Now standing there were six stone water-jars for the Jewish rites of purification, each holding twenty or thirty gallons. 7Jesus said to them, ‘Fill the jars with water.’ And they filled them up to the brim. 8He said to them, ‘Now draw some out, and take it to the chief steward.’ So they took it. 9When the steward tasted the water that had become wine, and did not know where it came from (though the servants who had drawn the water knew), the steward called the bridegroom 10and said to him, ‘Everyone serves the good wine first, and then the inferior wine after the guests have become drunk. But you have kept the good wine until now.’ 11Jesus did this, the first of his signs, in Cana of Galilee, and revealed his glory; and his disciples believed in him.

The Old Testament, New Testament and Gospels readings are from the New Revised Standard Version Bible: Anglicized Edition, copyright 1989, 1995, Division of Christian Education of the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

The Collects, Psalms and Canticles are from the Book of Common Prayer, 1979.

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Daily Readings ...

posted Jul 4, 2016, 6:42 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jan 14, 2019, 2:38 PM ]



The daily readings expand the range of biblical reading in worship and personal devotion.  These readings complement the Sunday and festival readings: Monday through Wednesday readings help the reader reflect on and digest what they heard in worship on Sunday; Thursday through Saturday readings help prepare the reader for the Sunday ahead.

Source:  http://lectionary.library.vanderbilt.edu/daily.php?year=C#id264


Note: For the readings after Pentecost: the first reading pairs with the semi-continuous strand of texts; the second, with the complementary.





Sunday, January 13, 2019: Baptism of the Lord

Reflection:

Preparation:




Sunday, January 20, 2019: Second Sunday after the Epiphany

Reflection:

Preparation:




Reproduced from Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings copyright © 2005 Consultation on Common Texts admin. Augsburg Fortress. Used by permission. A complete edition of the Daily Readings is available though Augsburg Fortress.



Calvary News and Announcements ...

posted Jun 15, 2016, 4:07 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jan 14, 2019, 3:19 PM ]







THANK YOU!!!

Calvary Church would like to express our sincere gratitude to
Marion L. Holmes and Sandella L. Stephens
for their donation of a beautiful candelabra

in loving memory of their parents
George and Mazie Long


MLK, Jr. PARADE

Calvary Church & The Episcopal Church in SC
will participate in the MLK, Jr., parade in downtown Charleston
Monday, January 21, 2019
9:00 - 10:00 a.m.  (Lineup is at 8:30 - 9:30 a.m.)
as part of the 47th annual MLK celebration sponsored by the YWCA of Greater Charleston.
Please help to make a BIG TURNOUT for Calvary as we join St. Stephen's, St. Mark's and Good Shepherd.
Calling all ECW, Men of Calvary, JOY Group, Gatherers - let's show up for Calvary!!!
Does anyone have a minivan for our elders???


  ECW OYSTER ROAST     
                           
The Episcopal Church Women will sponsor an
OYSTER ROAST
Saturday, January 26, 2019
2:00 - 5:00 p.m.
Donation:  $20 
Tickets are on sale and available NOW from ECW Members


CALVARY CHURCH'S ANNUAL CHURCH MEETING

The annual church meeting will be held on
Sunday, January 27, 2019 after service.
Please mark your calendar and plan to attend.


2019 COFFEE HOUR / FELLOWSHIP - VOLUNTEERS NEEDED!!!

Beginning on Sunday, January 6, 2019
and the 1st Sunday of each month
Volunteers are needed to sponsor and present the Repast after service
Please see Robin Blunt or contact her at (843) 813-3754



MEN OF CALVARY SHROVE TUESDAY PANCAKE SUPPER / RAFFLE / AUCTION

The Men of Calvary will sponsor their annual
PANCAKE SUPPER with RAFFLE & AUCTION
Tuesday, March 5, 2019
6:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Donation:  $4.00
Tickets will be available on January 14 from
Men of Calvary Members


   WINTER HOURS FOR THE JOY / CRAFTS GROUP

The JOY/Crafts group will meet from
2:00 pm - 4:00 pm on Tuesdays
during the shortened daylight period.


WINTER HOURS FOR THE GATHERERS

The Gatherers Around The Table will meet from
4:30 pm - 6:00 pm on Tuesdays
during the shortened daylight period


                                 
                  

Coastal Carolina Fair Ribbons for crafts group at Calvary



A crafts and knitting group (formerly known as the JOY Group) that meets at historic Calvary Episcopal Church in Charleston is celebrating the achievements of its members and the fellowship that their weekly meetings have fostered. The group gathered in December for an informal Christmas party and to view an array of handcrafts that their members entered for judging at the recent Coastal Carolina Fair.

Led by Veronica Sheppard and Pat Williams, who offer instruction to the group, Calvary members earned 22 ribbons at the annual fair.

The members also are taking on new projects to benefit others. Calvary's Priest-in-Charge, the Rev. Matt McCormick, has connected the group with the Medical University of South Carolina to create special blankets to be used for the burial of infants.

​The group meets every Tuesday afternoon at 2 pm at Calvary, and is always looking for new students and members. They recently welcomed a new member from nearby St. Mark's Episcopal. For information contact group member Andrea Lawrence at redhatladyandrea@icloud.com.
                   

CALVARY EPISCOPAL CHURCH WELCOMES REVEREND MATTHEW W. MCCORMICK AS THEIR NEW PRIEST-IN-CHARGE

The Vestry and Congregation of Calvary Episcopal Church is pleased to welcome the Reverend Matthew Wright McCormick as the new Priest-in-Charge at Calvary Church. Reverend "Matt" is gifted as a committed follower of Christ, a preacher and teacher, a dynamic worship leader, a man sensitive to and committed to multi-cultural ministry and a warm, vibrant welcoming pastor, who is well prepared and good at plugging people into ministries. He officially began in the office on Wednesday, August 1, 2018 and presided over his first service on Sunday, August 5.  The service was well attended as Calvary parishioners enthusiastically welcomed our new pastor.

Reverend McCormick grew up a cradle Episcopalian in the coastal city of Jacksonville, Florida. He graduated in 2001 from the College of Charleston and met his lovely wife, Lisa, during his early years working in the marketing and hospitality industry in our great city. He enjoys southern cooking, Charleston arts and music, great stories, and spending time with Lisa and their precious son, Colson.

Matt was ordained to the priesthood in 2008. He is a graduate of Trinity Episcopal School for Ministry in Ambridge, Pennsylvania; he has received a Masters of Theology degree from Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, and is currently working on doctoral studies. He has returned to Charleston with his family after serving as rector of Messiah Episcopal Church in St. Paul, Minnesota. Previously, he served as vicar of the Church of the Resurrection in North Charleston, South Carolina. Prior to that, he was an associate rector at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Charleston, a large congregation where he served in a variety of roles.

We prayerfully anticipate what God desires to do among us through Father Matt.





Renewal of Ordination Vows held at Calvary Church on February 20, 2018: 
The Bishop's Sermon

What role does memory play in the life of faith? Preaching at the annual renewal of ordination vows for clergy of our diocese, Bishop Skip Adams said that one of the central responsibilities of being a deacon, priest, or bishop "is to help the people of God to remember." 
Watch the video of the sermon and find the text of his sermon here.
Priests and deacons of our diocese gathered with Bishop Skip Adams at Calvary Episcopal Church in Charleston today to celebrate Holy Eucharist,
renew their ordination vows, and bless the oils used for baptism and healing.
This annual service is held during Lent, and we ask your prayers for all our clergy: Find a list at our website:



~~~~~~~~


House of Deputies Medal Awarded to Lonnie Hamilton




Lonnie Hamilton with the President of the House of Deputies, the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings,
onstage with the rest of the South Carolina deputation and Bishop Skip Adams.

On July 10, 2018,  the House of Deputies Medal was awarded to Lonnie Hamilton III, a lay deputy for South Carolina. House of Deputies President Gay Clark Jennings presented the award, honoring Lonnie's leadership and witness in serving the Church through a time of division and the ongoing reorganization in our diocese. Our deputation and Bishop Adams accompanied him to the stage as he received a standing ovation from more than 800 people present in the House of Deputies.



Watch the video here - the presentation begins at about 17:00 minutes.

Here is the text of President Jennings' presentation:

Now, back in 2012, we had a little excitement at General Convention. ... At that convention, held in the great diocese of Indianapolis, some of those gathered among us decided to leave the convention and, ultimately, to leave the Episcopal Church. Just one loyal Episcopalian from the former Diocese of South Carolina remained, and he is a gifted educator, a civil rights advocate, and an astonishing jazz saxophonist and clarinetist who has also been a faithful member of our church for more than 60 years. And through it all, he has never stopped working and praying and hoping that the people of his former diocese will find a way to come back together so that we all may be one."

Deputy Lonnie Hamilton of the Episcopal Church in South Carolina has been a member of Calvary Episcopal Church in Charleston for 57 years and served on the vestry, as choirmaster, and in many other leadership roles. He has served on the Standing Committee and the Diocesan Council in South Carolina, and this is his sixth General Convention as a deputy or alternate. He is a retired administrator with the Charleston County School District and served his community as a member of Charleston County Council for more than 20 years. He was the first African American to serve on that body and was twice elected as its chairman.

The House of Deputies is not, as you can imagine, the first organization to honor Lonnie’s faithful ministry. When he received the Dean’s Cross Award from Virginia Theological Seminary last year, the citation noted that Lonnie has “a reputation not only as a gifted educator but also as a charismatic figure who was popular with students and who could help ease tensions at Bonds-Wilson and other North Charleston area schools resulting from the Supreme Court’s Brown v. Board of Education decision. In the aftermath of Hurricane Hugo, he led the diocesan Community Housing Development Organization, which has converted dozens of properties into affordable housing units.”

As if all this weren’t enough, Lonnie toured with the Jenkins Orphanage Bands in the mid-1940s and played with his own band, Lonnie Hamilton and the Diplomats, which was the signature jazz band in Charleston for decades.

For his distinguished service to the Episcopal Church and to the community we serve in Charleston, South Carolina, I am honored to award the House of Deputies medal to Deputy Lonnie Hamilton.


~~~~~~~~


Our own Mr. Lonnie Hamilton III has been awarded the prestigious DEAN'S CROSS award by the Virginia Theological Seminary.

Established in November 2008, the Dean’s Cross award recognizes outstanding leaders who embody their baptismal vows to “strive for justice and peace among all people and respect the dignity of every human being.”  Selected annually by the Seminary Dean in consultation with the Chair of the Board, the Honorees receive a handmade silver cross, modeled after the Seminary Chapel cross, and a certificate.  

“Our work here at Virginia Seminary is formation,” said the Very Rev. Ian Markham, dean and president of Virginia Seminary, “and this award celebrates the well-formed life, which involves living out the values of the baptismal covenant and making a difference in society.”



                       
   Past Recipients of the award include:

   December 7, 2014
  • Ms. Madeleine Albright from Washington, D.C.
    Former (and the first female) Secretary of State of the United States of America

   December 6, 2015
  • Mrs. Barbara Bush from Houston, TX.
    Former First Lady of the United States of America




  • ON JULY 23, 2017, CALVARY CHURCH  WELCOMED MEMBERS OF ST. MARY'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH FROM WAYNE, PENNSYLVANIA
Fr. Joseph Smith, Rector, and Members of St. Mary's Episcopal Church in Wayne, PA  were in the Charleston area on July 23 for a mission trip with a group called Home Works. They worked primarily on John's Island, bringing around 22 youth and adults. Calvary extended our warmest welcome to these travelers to worship with us that Sunday. 

.

 




This was a return visit for the Youth Group and group leaders of St. Mary's to do their mission work on John's Island. 
Follow the link below to see pictures from last  year's visit.









ECW  FISH FRY on February 23    
The Episcopal Church Women (ECW) will host a  FISH FRY on Friday, February 23 from 4 - 6 pm.
Tickets are $10

Location: Calvary Church Parish Hall, 104 Line Street, Charleston SC 29403



ECW  OYSTER ROAST on April 7
The Episcopal Church Women will host their annual Oyster Roast on April 7, 2018 from 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm. 
Tickets are $20 adults and $10 children ages 6-12 years.
Location: Calvary Church Parish Hall, 104 Line Street, Charleston SC 29403



EpisComm18 is coming to Kanuga April 17-20

The national Episcopal Communicators Conference will be April 17-20, 2018 at Kanuga Episcopal Conference Center near Hendersonville NC. Registration is now open, and I am planning to attend this as well.  

Please consider attending (or sending someone to) this important national conference - both for the excellent workshops and speakers, and for the opportunity to meet people from all over The Episcopal Church who are doing this kind of work, too. You will come home with fresh inspiration, exciting ideas, and new friendships. 



~~~~~~~~






Our own Mr. Lonnie Hamilton III has been awarded the prestigious DEAN'S CROSS award by the Virginia Theological Seminary.

Established in November 2008, the Dean’s Cross award recognizes outstanding leaders who embody their baptismal vows to “strive for justice and peace among all people and respect the dignity of every human being.”  Selected annually by the Seminary Dean in consultation with the Chair of the Board, the Honorees receive a handmade silver cross, modeled after the Seminary Chapel cross, and a certificate.  

“Our work here at Virginia Seminary is formation,” said the Very Rev. Ian Markham, dean and president of Virginia Seminary, “and this award celebrates the well-formed life, which involves living out the values of the baptismal covenant and making a difference in society.”



                       
   Past Recipients of the award include:

   December 7, 2014
  • Ms. Madeleine Albright from Washington, D.C.
    Former (and the first female) Secretary of State of the United States of America

   December 6, 2015
  • Mrs. Barbara Bush from Houston, TX.
    Former First Lady of the United States of America




  • ON JULY 23, 2017, CALVARY CHURCH  WELCOMED MEMBERS OF ST. MARY'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH FROM WAYNE, PENNSYLVANIA
Fr. Joseph Smith, Rector, and Members of St. Mary's Episcopal Church in Wayne, PA  were in the Charleston area on July 23 for a mission trip with a group called Home Works. They worked primarily on John's Island, bringing around 22 youth and adults. Calvary extended our warmest welcome to these travelers to worship with us that Sunday. 

.

 




This was a return visit for the Youth Group and group leaders of St. Mary's to do their mission work on John's Island. 
Follow the link below to see pictures from last  year's visit.


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NEWS BLOG - AROUND THE DIOCESE - Events, Resources, Services

posted Jun 15, 2016, 2:30 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jan 7, 2019, 3:07 PM by joan bonaparte ]

 
 
 
​A knitting group that meets at historic Calvary Episcopal Church in Charleston is celebrating the achievements of its members and the fellowship that their weekly meetings have fostered. The group gathered in December for an informal Christmas party and to view an array of handcrafts that their members entered for judging at the recent Coastal Carolina Fair.

Led by Pat Williams, a knitting expert who offers instruction to the group, Calvary members earned 22 ribbons at the annual fair.

The knitters also are taking on new projects to benefit others. Calvary's Priest-in-Charge, the Rev. Matt McCormick, has connected the knitters with the Medical University of South Carolina to create special blankets used for the burial of infants.

​The group meets every Tuesday afternoon at 2 pm at Calvary, and is always looking for new students and members. They recently welcomed a new member from nearby St. Mark's Episcopal. For information contact group member Andrea Lawrence at redhatladyandrea@icloud.com. 
 
Picture
New adult education opportunities are beginning in January in churches around the diocese. Here are some of the offerings. (If your church would like to add to this list, please email info@episcopalchurchsc.org)

All Saints, Hilton Head Island
A Thursday book study will begin January 10 and run through April 18 at 11 am, based on the book Naked Spirituality: A Life with God in 12 Simple Words by Brian McLaren. The group will discuss a different word each week. Details and a schedule are available here.


Grace Church Cathedral
"History of the Christian Church" – On Wednesdays from January 23-February 27, from 12:00-1:30 pm, the Very Rev. Michael Wright and Steve Rhodes will lead six classes at Grace  focusing on the history of the Christian Church during the medieval era, based on Diarmaid MacCulloch’s Christianity: The First Three Thousand Years. Lunch is provided.​
 


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Holy Cross Faith Memorial, Pawleys Island
A Community Book Study organized by the Health & Well Being ministry, led by Rev. Jason Roberson and Rev. Johnny Ford, will meet Thursdays at 5 pm at Holy Cross Faith Memorial beginning January 3 and continuing through February 7. The group will discuss The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander.  Joining the community onversation are House of God Church and St. Peter's Lutheran Church. 

St. Stephen's, Charleston
"Global Mission in The Episcopal Church" is the title of a January series on Sundays at 10 am starting January 6 at St. Stephen's, Charleston. Session 1 will be an overview of global mission in the Church. On January 13, parishioner Magi Griffin will share her experience as a long-term Episcopal missionary to Tanzania. January 20: The Rev. Adam Shoemaker shares his experience as a Young Adult Service Corps missionary to Brazil. January 27: The Rev. Jason Roberson of Holy Cross Faith Memorial, Pawleys Island will talk about our diocese's companion relationship with the Episcopal Church in the Dominican Republic. Child care is provided.

 
The new year brings a new calendar of musical events to churches around our diocese. Here's a listing of events planned in early 2019. Save this link and check back as we add new events to the calendar through the spring.

January 18: Classical Guitar Concert
 All Saint's, Hilton Head Island, 12 pm. 
Acclaimed guitarist Dr. Brian Luckett of Jacksonville, Florida performs a varied program of classical guitar. A $20 donation is suggested.


January 20:
Organ Dedication Concert
​with 'Deux Voix' 

St. Mark's, Charleston, 4 pm.
The concert will feature the trumpet-organ duo Deux Voix.

January 20: 'Music for the Seasons' Winter Concert 
St. Stephen's, North Myrtle Beach, 4 pm. 
The program features Kim Carey (flute) and Roberta Rowland-Raybold (piano, harpsicord and organ). A reception will follow. Details here.


February 3: Choral Evensong 
Grace Church Cathedral, Charleston, 4 pm.
Grace's St. Gregory Choir sings this service of Evening Prayer set to music for the Feast of the Presentation of Our Lord Jesus Christ in the Temple (Candlemas).

February 8: Handel & Bach Concert 
All Saints, Hilton Head Island, 7 pm.
Featuring Handel’s Organ Concerto in G minor, Op 4. No. 3 & Bach’s Solo Cantata for Soprano Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen sung by Rebecca Flaherty; both with chamber orchestra. A $20 donation is suggested.

February 22: All Saints on Broadway
All Saints, Hilton Head Island, 6:30 pm. Members of the parish choir will perform an
array of music from Broadway. Hors d’oeuvres and beverages will be served during the performance. Tickets are $25.

March 3: Mardi Gras Blues Choral Evensong
St. Stephen's, Charleston will offer a Mardi Gras Blues Choral Evensong on the last Sunday of Epiphany, with a New Orleans-style band and choral works by William Dawson and Jester Hairston. A festive Mardi Gras reception will follow. 

March 24: Lenten Recital & Evensong
All Saints, Hilton Head Island, 4 pm.
A contemplative service based on Plainsong chant, sung by the Chamber Choir. Evensong
begins with a 30-minute organ recital.

April 7: Lenten Choral Evensong
Grace Church Cathedral, Charleston, 4 pm.
Grace's St. Gregory Choir and St. Nicholas Choristers will sing this service of Evening Prayer set to music for the Fifth Sunday in Lent.

April 14: Chilcott Requiem
All Saints, Hilton Head Island, 4 pm
A concert of music for Holy Week, sung by the Parish Choir, featuring the Chilcott Requiem with a woodwind chamber orchestra and organ. A $20 donation is suggested.
 
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The Reverend Bob Diehl, a retired priest who served as supply clergy for several congregations in our diocese, died this morning after a prolonged illness following heart surgery in October.

The combined congregations of Good Shepherd and St. George’s in Summerville will celebrate his life with a requiem Eucharist at St. George’s, 9110 Dorchester Rd., on Friday, December 21 at 11:00 am. (Please note the time of the service, which has been updated from the initial announcement.)

Fr. Diehl and his wife the Rev. Jane Diehl, a deacon, have been attending Church of the Good Shepherd. Born in Detroit on December 29, 1941, he was ordained in 2008 and was canonically resident in the Episcopal Diocese of Eastern Michigan.
 
Rest eternal grant him, O Lord; let light perpetual shine upon him.

The Episcopal Church in South Carolina (TECSC) and The Episcopal Church have asked the U.S. District Court to grant motions for summary judgment and call a halt to the “pervasive” public confusion caused by a group that broke away from the church, yet continues to use Episcopal names and marks.

The motion asks U.S. District Judge Richard M. Gergel to prohibit false advertising and the use of confusing names and marks by the breakaway group and its affiliated churches. A motion for summary judgment is a request for the court to rule that the other party has no case, because there are no facts at issue.

“The public confusion resulting from Defendants’ conduct is pervasive,” according to a memo filed by TECSC on December 7 in support of the motion. “It is undeniably causing irreparable harm to The Episcopal Church, and more locally, to TECSC and its Bishops. All that the Plaintiffs seek in this action is declaratory and injunctive relief, not damages (for which they could easily make a case).”

The lawsuit, known as vonRosenberg v. Lawrence, was filed in March 2013 by Bishop Charles vonRosenberg, who was the only bishop recognized by The Episcopal Church and the Anglican Communion as bishop of the Diocese of South Carolina at that time. Bishop vonRosenberg retired in 2016, and his successor, Bishop Gladstone B. Adams III, was added as a plaintiff in the case. The Episcopal Church and its local diocese, TECSC, also joined the case as plaintiffs.

In April, Judge Gergel ordered the expansion of the lawsuit, adding as defendants to the case the diocesan organization and trustees who are operating under Bishop Mark Lawrence, and the 54 parishes that followed him after the 2012 split. Those groups have been operating under the names “The Protestant Episcopal Church in the Diocese of South Carolina” and "Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina," and the confusion created by that is one facet of the trademark infringement and false-advertising claims. The court has set a target date of March 1, 2019 for a trial to begin.

The federal case is aimed primarily at resolving federal trademark infringement and false-advertising issues raised by the split. In a separate case, the South Carolina Supreme Court ruled in August 2017 that property of the diocese and 29 parishes must be returned to The Episcopal Church and TECSC. That decision resulted from a state lawsuit filed by the breakaway group in 2013 against The Episcopal Church and TECSC.

The memo filed December 7 by TECSC cites the state Supreme Court's 3-2 ruling that TECSC, not the group led by Mark Lawrence, is the true Episcopal diocese in the eastern half of South Carolina.  According to the memo, TECSC has the right to all the diocesan names and marks, including the historic seal of the Diocese of South Carolina.

"The use of all of the diocesan names and marks, and the goodwill that arose from such use over many years, inured to the one and only historic diocese at issue. That goodwill in the diocesan names and marks cannot be divvied up, pursuant to the following well-established principles of trademark law," the memo says.

The Episcopal Church filed a separate Motion for Summary Judgment and a supporting memo on December 7. “Defendants have purported to disaffiliate from the Church, but continue to use the names they used when they were part of the Church and/or continue to hold themselves out as belonging to the ‘Episcopal’ diocese led by the ‘Episcopal’ bishop. These actions are not only likely to cause confusion, but, as we detail below, have caused confusion over and over again,” the memo says.

Defendants in the breakaway group also have filed counterclaims and motions with the federal court in connection with the case.

ECW Oyster Roast, January 26, 2019 2:00 - 5:00 p.m., Donation $20 ...

posted May 23, 2016, 3:48 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Dec 18, 2018, 7:44 AM ]

   The Episcopal Church Women of Calvary Church will sponsor their annual OYSTER ROAST on Saturday, January 26, 2019 from 2:00 - 5:00 p.m.   Donations: $20  
Tickets are available NOW from ECW members.



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CALVARY EPISCOPAL CHURCH WELCOMES REVEREND MATTHEW W. MCCORMICK

posted Mar 13, 2016, 11:55 AM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jul 21, 2018, 4:46 PM by joan bonaparte ]

CALVARY EPISCOPAL CHURCH WELCOMES REVEREND MATTHEW W. MCCORMICK AS THEIR NEW PRIEST-IN-CHARGE

The Vestry and Congregation of Calvary Episcopal Church is pleased to welcome the Reverend Matthew Wright McCormick as the new Priest-in-Charge at Calvary Church. Reverend "Matt" is gifted as a committed follower of Christ, a preacher and teacher, a dynamic worship leader, a man sensitive to and committed to multi-cultural ministry and a warm, vibrant welcoming pastor, who is well prepared and good at plugging people into ministries. He will officially begin in the office on Wednesday, August 1, 2018 and preside over his first service on Sunday, August 5. A welcome reception will follow the service.

Reverend McCormick grew up a cradle Episcopalian in the coastal city of Jacksonville, Florida. He graduated in 2001 from the College of Charleston and met his lovely wife, Lisa, during his early years working in the marketing and hospitality industry in our great city. He enjoys southern cooking, Charleston arts and music, great stories, and spending time with Lisa and their precious son, Colson.

Matt was ordained to the priesthood in 2008. He is a graduate of Trinity Episcopal School for Ministry in Ambridge, Pennsylvania; he has received a Masters of Theology degree from Luther Seminary in St. Paul, Minnesota, and is currently working on doctoral studies. He has returned to Charleston with his family after serving as rector of Messiah Episcopal Church in St. Paul, Minnesota. Previously, he served as vicar of the Church of the Resurrection in North Charleston, South Carolina. Prior to that, he was an associate rector at St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Charleston, a large congregation where he served in a variety of roles.

We prayerfully anticipate what God desires to do among us through Father Matt.




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Men of Calvary Shrove Tuesday Pancake Supper, March 5, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. Tickets $4

posted Feb 1, 2016, 4:42 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jan 14, 2019, 3:15 PM ]


              
Tickets are $4.00 per Raffle Entry 
Raffle Prizes:  $50, $25 and $25 
Annual Auction after Supper 

    
Calvary Church Parish Hall
104-106 Line Street, Charleston, SC 29403
    
Tickets available from Men of Calvary members

Free parking is available behind the church






Mardi Gras or Carnival

Carnival, which comes from a Latin phrase meaning "removal of meat," is the three day period preceding the beginning of Lent, the Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday immediately before Ash Wednesday, which is the first day of the Lenten Season (some traditions count Carnival as the entire period of time between Epiphany and Ash Wednesday). The three days before Ash Wednesday are also known as Shrovetide ("shrove" is an Old English word meaning "to repent"). The Tuesday just before Ash Wednesday is called Shrove Tuesday, or is more popularly known by the French term Mardi Gras, meaning "Fat Tuesday," contrasting to the fasting during Lent. The entire three day period has now come to be known in many areas as Mardi Gras.

Carnival or Mardi Gras is usually a period of celebration, originally a festival before the fasting during the season of Lent. Now it is celebrated in many places with parades, costumes, dancing, and music. Many Christians’ discomfort with Lent originates with a distaste for Mardi Gras. In some cultures, especially the Portuguese culture of Brazil, the French culture of Louisiana, and some of the Caribbean cultures such as Trinidad, it has tended to take on the excesses of wild and drunken revelry. There has been some attempt in recent years to change this aspect of the season, such as using Brazilian Carnival parades to focus on national and cultural history. Many churches now observe Mardi Gras with a church pancake breakfast or other church meal, eating together as a community before the symbolic fasting of Lent begins.

Ash Wednesday

Ash Wednesday, the seventh Wednesday before Easter Sunday, is the first day of the Season of Lent. Its name comes from the ancient practice of placing ashes on worshippers’ heads or foreheads as a sign of humility before God, a symbol of mourning and sorrow at the death that sin brings into the world. It not only prefigures the mourning at the death of Jesus, but also places the worshipper in a position to realize the consequences of sin.  (See Reflections on Ash Wednesday). Ash Wednesday is a somber day of reflection on what needs to change in our lives if we are to be fully Christian.

In the early church, ashes were not offered to everyone but were only used to mark the forehead of worshippers who had made public confession of sin and sought to be restored to the fellowship of the community at the Easter celebration. However, over the years others began to show their humility and identification with the penitents by asking that they, too, be marked as sinners. Finally, the imposition of ashes was extended to the whole congregation in services similar to those that are now observed in many Christian churches on Ash Wednesday. Ashes became symbolic of that attitude of penitence reflected in the Lord’s prayer:  “forgive us our sins, for we ourselves forgive everyone indebted to us”  (Luke 11:4, NRSV).



SHROVE TUESDAY

Shrove Tuesday is a day of indulging in the rich, fatty foods that were traditionally abstained from during Lent. Making pancakes was a way to use up butter, milk, sugar and eggs before the 40-day fast. Photo: Natalia Van Doninck/Shutterstock

[Anglican Journal] 

What is Shrove Tuesday?

Celebrated the day before Ash Wednesday, Shrove Tuesday (also called “Pancake Tuesday” or “Pancake Day”) is the final day before the 40-day period of Lent begins. This year it falls on Feb. 13.

Its name comes from the Germanic-Old English word “shrive,” meaning absolve, and it is the last day of the liturgical season historically known as Shrovetide. Because it comes directly before Lent, a season of fasting and penitence, this was the day that Christians would go to be “shriven” by their confessor.

Shrove Tuesday also became a day for pre-fasting indulgence. In particular, the need to use up rich ingredients such as butter, milk, sugar and eggs before Lent gave rise to the tradition of eating pancakes on this day.

There are even historical references to a “pancake bell” in English towns being rung around 11 a.m. on this day to signal that it was time to get frying.

For Anglican churches across Canada, Shrove Tuesday means gathering for a pancake supper. Many churches host dinners or luncheons, serving pancakes usually with a range of toppings, fruit and sides like bacon or sausages. Visitors are usually asked to give a small contribution or freewill offering.


In Madeira, Portugal and Hawaii, malasadas
— doughnut-like, sugar-coated confections — are eaten the day before Ash Wednesday. Photo: Bonchan/Shutterstock

Feasts and fests around the world

While in the United Kingdom and Commonwealth countries, pancakes are traditionally eaten, other countries across the globe celebrate with different dishes.

In Spain, the day is named día de la tortilla, or “omelette day,” and the traditional food is an omelette made with sausage or pork fat. In Madeira, Portugal and Hawaii, malasadas —doughnut-like, sugar-coated confections — are eaten.

In Iceland, people traditionally gorge on salted meat and peas on the day illustratively called Sprengidagur (“Bursting Day”). Green pea soup and a whipped-cream-filled pastry are the orders of the day in Finland and Estonia.

Louisiana famously celebrates Mardi Gras (French for “Fat Tuesday”) on this day, a carnival that includes a giant parade through the city. Other countries, including Brazil, Belgium, the Cayman Islands, France, Russia and Ukraine, hold Mardi Gras celebrations with carnivals and festivals.

Pancake parties

In Newfoundland and Cape Breton Island, an added tradition sees small items baked into the pancakes that are served on Shrove Tuesday. These objects have symbolic value: “a coin means the person finding it will be rich; a pencil stub means he/she will be a teacher; a holy medal means they will join a religious order; a nail that they will be (or marry) a carpenter, and so on,” according to the Newfoundland and Labrador Heritage website.

Many towns and villages throughout the United Kingdom celebrate with pancake races, in which runners with frying pans — and often wearing aprons or chefs’ hats — race while tossing and catching a pancake. In London, the Rehab Parliamentary Pancake Race takes place every year, with members of Parliament, Lords and members of the press picking up frying pans and competing to raise money for charity.

— Joelle Kidd joined the Anglican Journal in 2017 as staff writer. She has worked as an editor and writer for the Winnipeg-based Fanfare Magazine Group and as freelance copy editor for Naida Communications.

Pączki are deep-fried pieces of dough shaped into flattened spheres and filled with confiture or other sweet filling. Pączki are usually covered with powdered sugar, icing, glaze or bits of dried orange zest. A small amount of grain alcohol (traditionally, Spiritus) is added to the dough before cooking; as it evaporates, it prevents the absorption of oil deep into the dough.[1] The common opinion is that the ideal pączek is fluffy and at the same time a bit collapsed, with a bright stripe around – it is supposed to guarantee that the dough was fried in fresh oil.[2][3]

Although they look like German berliners, North American bismarcks or jelly doughnuts, pączki are made from especially rich dough containing eggs, fats, sugar, yeast and sometimes milk. They feature a variety of fruit and creme fillings and can be glazed, or covered with granulated or powdered sugar. Powidła (stewed plum jam) and wild rose hip jam[1][4] are traditional fillings, but many others are used as well, including strawberry, Bavarian cream, blueberry, custard, raspberry, and apple.[5]

Pączki have been known in Poland at least since the Middle Ages. Jędrzej Kitowicz has described that during the reign of August III, under the influence of French cooks who came to Poland, pączki dough was improved, so that pączki became lighter, spongier, and more resilient.

In Poland, pączki are eaten especially on Fat Thursday (Tłusty Czwartek), the last Thursday prior to Ash Wednesday and the beginning of Lent.[17] The traditional reason for making pączki was to use up all the lard, sugar, eggs and fruit in the house, because their consumption was forbidden by Christian fasting practices during the season of Lent.

In North America, particularly the large Polish communities of Chicago, Detroit, and other large cities across the Midwest and Northeast, Paczki Day is celebrated annually by immigrants and locals alike. The date of this observance merges with that of pre-Lenten traditions of other immigrants (e.g., Pancake Day, Mardi Gras) on Fat Tuesday. With its sizable Polish population, Chicago celebrates the festival on both Fat Thursday and Fat Tuesday;[18] pączki are also often eaten on Casimir Pulaski Day. In Buffalo, Toledo, Cleveland, Detroit, Grand Rapids, Milwaukee, South Bend, and Windsor, Pączki Day is celebrated on Fat Tuesday.

The Pączki Day celebrations in some areas are even larger than many celebrations for St. Patrick's Day. In Hamtramck, Michigan, an enclave of Detroit, there is an annual Pączki Day (Shrove Tuesday) Parade,[5] which has gained a devoted following. Throughout the Metro Detroit area, it is so widespread that many bakeries attract lines of customers for pączki on Pączki Day.[19]

In some areas, Pączki Day is celebrated with pączki-eating contests. The contest in Evanston, Illinois, started in 2010, and is held on the weekend before Fat Tuesday, while Hamtramck's contest is held on the holiday.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/P%C4%85czki

  • Pączki displayed for sale

  • Traditional pączki serowe or oponki

  • Home-made glazed pączki

  • Assorted pączki commercially produced near Detroit






Frequently Asked Questions is now available online.

posted Oct 26, 2015, 8:07 AM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jul 23, 2018, 2:40 PM ]

(Updated July 16, 2018)
Read, download and share here.


UPDATED FAQ NOW AVAILABLE


We invite you to explore our new “Frequently Asked Questions” supplement. This is offered to provide information and share hope for a future that remains grounded in the love of God in the reconciliation in the diocese and the churches of eastern South Carolina.. ​
Read, download & share it here. >

The "Frequently Asked Questions" document published by our diocese in May has been updated, and is now available online. The new version includes important updates, such as the contact information for our Missioner for Returning Congregations, the Rev. William Coyne. Please read, download and share this supplement with anyone you know who has questions.



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Upcoming Events Around the Diocese: Events, resources & services

posted Oct 23, 2015, 9:04 AM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jan 2, 2019, 3:09 PM by joan bonaparte ]



                                        

SC Bishops' Annual Prayer Service

January 17, 2019 
The Fellowship of South Carolina Bishops invites everyone to its Annual Prayer Service on Thursday, January 17 at 6:30 pm at Vanderhorst Memorial Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, 66 Hanover St. in Charleston. Bishop Skip Adams and our diocese are participants in this ecumenical fellowship of bishops from around South Carolina, whose focus is on improving public education in our state. 

Bishop James B. Walker, Presiding Bishop of the Seventh Episcopal District of the Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, will be the preacher. The service will be an invitation to prayer and action in support of public education. Find our more about the S.C. Bishops Public Education Initiative online at bishopseducation.com.


Martin Luther King Jr. Day Parade

January 21, 2019 in Charleston
Bishop Adams and representatives of the diocese, along with several churches, will march in the annual MLK Day Parade in downtown Charleston. It's part of an annual celebration of Dr. King is sponsored by the YWCA of Greater Charleston.


4th Annual Bishop's Lock-In

February 1-2, 2019 at Grace Church Cathedral, Charleston
Middle and High School youth and adult church leaders are invited to a fun night of games, fellowship, and worship with Bishop Adams. Registration is $30 and includes dinner, breakfast, and a t-shirt. Scholarships are available. Details Details and registration here.


Absalom Jones Day at Voorhees College

February 12 at Voorhees College, Denmark, SC
Voorhees remembers Absalom Jones, the first African American priest ordained in The Episcopal Church, at an annual service in historic St. Philip's Chapel. 


Diocesan-wide Racial Reconciliation Training Day

February 28 at Middleton Plantation near Charleston 
This all-day event provides mandated training for all clergy, canonical and licensed, and for elected diocesan leadership, as mandated by Resolution B049 from General Convention 2000. Other lay leaders are also strongly encouraged and invited to attend. Please save the date; further details will be shared in early 2019.


Happening Weekend for Youth at Camp St. Christopher

March 1-2 at St. Christopher Camp & Conference Center, Seabrook Island 
High-schoolers (grades 9-12) are invited to this spiritual weekend for youth, led by youth. Find details here.


Clergy Renewal of Vows

Tuesday, April 2
This annual service, held during Lent, is a time for clergy to renew their Ordination Vows and includes the blessing of oils used for baptism and healing. Location and details will be shared in early 2019.


Annual Diocesan Clergy Conference

May 5-8 at Kanuga Episcopal Conference Center
Clergy of the diocese will gather with Bishop Adams for this annual conference, held again this year at Kanuga near Hendersonville, NC. Details and registration information will be shared in early 2019.

The Gathering at the Table Group meets on Tuesdays 4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

posted Sep 28, 2015, 2:19 PM by CalvaryEpiscopal Church   [ updated Jan 2, 2019, 3:10 PM by joan bonaparte ]







The Gathering at the Table group was formed through the initiative of Judith Ewing, an Episcopal deacon who serves at East Cooper Episcopal Church.  She sought out the Rev. Michael Burton, a supply priest at Calvary, about setting up an initial gathering.  Members of Calvary Episcopal Church and members of East Cooper Episcopal Church meet in the Calvary Church Parish Hall each Tuesday evening to share their perspectives on matters of race - past and present. 

Originally scheduled to meet for four weeks in October, 2015, the group has bonded and grown in their commitment.  They continue to meet, entertaining lively and healing discussions.  All are invited and encouraged to attend.




  • The Gatherers visited the National Museum of African American History in Washington, DC on August 28 - 30, 2017.
  • The East Cooper Episcopal Church has a new home. They now hold Sunday services at 10:00 A.M. at the J. Henry Stuhr Mount Pleasant Chapel at 1494 Mathis Ferry Road, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464
  • The Gatherers attended the dedication ceremony at the Penn Center in Beaufort, SC and were excited to speak with The Honorable James Clyburn after his presentation.
    Members pictured here left to right: Wallace and Joan Bonaparte, Congressman Clyburn, Hannah Heyward and Masha Britten.

  • The Gatherers viewed the movie 13th and are holding ongoing discussions.











Picture

'Gather Around the Table'

Friday, June 17, marks one year since the night a gunman took the lives of nine people at Emanuel AME Church. As we remember this anniversary, may we pause in prayer for the people who died, for those who still mourn, and for every life that was irrevocably affected by the tragedy of that night in 2015.

The following article represents one way in which people in The Episcopal Church in South Carolina are responding after Emanuel to seek a path toward understanding and reconciliation. In the days ahead, we encourage others to share their stories, too.

O God, it is your will to hold both heaven and earth in a single peace. Let the design of your great love shine on the pains of our woundedness, confusion and great sorrow, and continue to bring peace to our community, peace to your Church, peace among peoples, and peace in our homes. And may the balm of your reconciling love lived out among us continue to soothe our suffering hearts. All this we pray in name of our wounded and risen Savior, God with us, Jesus Christ. Amen.

​It’s a June evening in Charleston, and the back door of the church is unlocked. People come in at their own pace, embracing, smiling, setting down plates of cookies on the big table in the parish hall.

No one speaks of it yet, but on everyone’s mind is a June evening in Charleston almost one year earlier, when nine people were shot dead just a mile away at Emanuel AME Church, in an African American congregation that opened its doors and invited the killer into their weekly Bible study.

The horror of June 17, 2015 and the days that followed gave way to deep grief, and deep questions. How could this have happened? What could I be doing to change that? How can we find bridges across the barriers of race?

Every Tuesday night, a small group from two local Episcopal churches, East Cooper and Calvary, have been meeting to see if they can find some answers. The name they have given themselves reflects the simple agenda for the group: “Gatherers Around the Table.”

After the massacre at Mother Emanuel, The Episcopal Church in South Carolina accelerated its plan to offer anti-racism training for the diocese – training that is required by Episcopal Church canons, but was never offered until a rift in 2012 brought new leadership. Bishop Charles G. vonRosenberg, who took office in January 2013, immediately put anti-racism training on his  short-list of needs for the reorganizing diocese, and the first one was on the calendar when the Emanuel tragedy struck.

In September 2015, Calvary hosted one of four “Traces of the Trade” conferences offered around the diocese. Each event encouraged people to open their minds and hearts to conversations about the legacy of slavery and racism.

Judith Ewing, an Episcopal deacon who serves at East Cooper, was at the Calvary program. “I realized how ignorant I was,” she said. “I realized the importance of relationships, of just getting to know each other. I just knew we needed to gather at the table.”
 
She quickly sought out the Rev. Michael Burton, a supply priest at Calvary, about setting up an initial gathering. The first one happened in October: Six people from each congregation, who committed to meeting every Tuesday for a trial run of six weeks.

Like Emanuel, Calvary has deep roots in Charleston’s history, founded in 1847 for “religious instruction” of enslaved African Americans. For years, it housed the only preschool and kindergarten for African American children on the Charleston peninsula, and many leaders passed through its doors. The first black jurist to serve on an appellate court in the United States, Jonathan Jasper Wright, was buried in its churchyard in 1885.

By comparison, the East Cooper Episcopal Church is in its infancy. Approved as a new mission congregation at Diocesan Convention in 2014, it serves the predominantly white suburbs across the Cooper River from Charleston. It was formed by Episcopalians who were left without a place to worship when churches in that area went with the breakaway group that left The Episcopal Church in 2012.
 
With widely different backgrounds, the two groups shared one common characteristic: Curiosity, and a desire to learn about each other.
 
Their first meeting was planned as a simple Bible study, “because that would be sweet and safe and nobody would say anything that will upset anybody,” Ewing said. “But I said, ‘Maybe we need to say things that upset people.’”
 
Artist and educator Marlene O’Bryant-Seabrook was there, and had the same reaction. Ewing recalls her saying: “I’ve been to many Bible studies, and nobody ever mentions the elephant in the middle of the room. Why can’t we mention the elephant in the room?”
 
Eight months later, the elephant is still loose. Trayvon Martin and Freddie Gray. The challenges of growing up in a mixed-race family. Assumptions about intelligence. Co-workers who act friendly, but never get close. The Spoleto production of “Porgy and Bess.” Ethnic foods they like and dislike. It’s all on the table when they gather.
 
“We’ve never put aside anything, or say ‘We mustn’t talk about that.’ We talk about everything,” Deacon Ewing says.
 

Along the way, others have joined. One member recently moved from New York after years in churches that were active in social justice issues, looking for a community in Charleston where that could keep happening. Another regular Gatherer is a social worker from another church who came with an East Cooper friend.  “I thought I knew almost everything about black culture, especially in Charleston,” she says, laughing. “But I don’t.”

Dr. O’Bryant-Seabrook, a Calvary member in her 80s, has become the group’s matriarch and historian. On the recent Tuesday night in June, she gave them all an assignment: Come up with a personal statement about why they came to be “Gatherers Around the Table,” and then create a small journal-quilt to illustrate it. A few skeptical looks were exchanged around the table, but the group quickly warmed up to the task of explaining why they come to the meetings week after week.
 
The Tuesday before the Emanuel anniversary, they were putting the final touches on their letter-sized pieces of fabric art filled with color, symbols, and words like Curious, Sharing, Understanding, Love, and Hope. Beside an image of Emanuel, one proclaims: “Hate Will Not Win!”
 
As a child growing up in Charleston, Dr. O’Bryant-Seabrook says, “I could not go three blocks without passing a church. I remember asking my mother, ‘I would like to know what they’re praying for.’ With all the inequities and oppression, I wondered, were they praying for something that black churches were not praying for?”
 
Decades later, those questions persist. “I wanted to be a part of this group because for a long, long, long, long time, I wanted to be comfortable in a group of caucasians and blacks where we can actually, openly, honestly and safely discuss what happens, and why it happens,” she says.

As the members of the group went around the room, the words “safe place” came up again and again.
 
“When we started, we said we weren’t’ going to judge, or say “You shouldn’t be saying that,” Deacon Ewing says. “We were going to accept each one in our knowledge and our ignorance, and love each other anyway.”
 
As the gathering wraps up, the group continues to share their ideas as they pass the plates of cookies around the table. “When you eat with somebody, it changes the whole dynamic,” one woman says. “It gives me a lot of hope.”
 
In the words of Anne Nietert’s journal quilt: “Anger exploded into the Palmetto night, but, in the shadows, a new day is dawning as we Gather at the Table to learn, to listen, and to love.” 
 
Holly Behre, Director of Communications
The Episcopal Church in South Carolina

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